Unit 10-2handout - Please complete course evaluations for...

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Unformatted text preview: Please complete course evaluations for the TAs at ieval.ucr.edu Review of Unit 10-1 1. Sequencing genomes: how and why Shotgun approach vs ordered clone approach Assembly is computationally challenging 1. What do you do with a genome sequence? Identify the genes! • Similarity to known genes in other organisms • Identity with EST sequences • Based on conserved sequence features - GC content, splice sites, open reading frames, etc Identifying Genes From Chromosome Sequence Data- In intensely studied species , enough is known about gene structure (base composition, promoter structure, introns, etc.) to design computer programs that can identify most (85%) genes.- So many genes have already been cloned that "new" genes can be predicted by similarity to known genes (even from other species).-If ESTs (cDNAs) were sequenced, can check for similarity to chromosome sequence. "BLAST" Predicting Function By Similarity Proteins of similar function often have similar sequences due t evolution from a common ancestor hexokinase catalytic site High similarity Low similarity Evolution: change in DNA sequence (=protein sequence) Review of Unit 10-1 1. Sequencing genomes: how and why Shotgun approach vs ordered clone approach Assembly is computationally challenging 1. What do you do with a genome sequence? Identify the genes! • Similarity to known genes in other organisms • Identity with EST sequences • Based on conserved sequence features - GC content, splice sites, open reading frames, etc E xpressed S equence T ags (ESTs) Partial sequence of clones in a cDNA library Every cDNA sequence comes from a gene. Identifying Genes From Chromosome Sequence Data- In intensely studied species , enough is known about gene structure (base composition, promoter structure, introns, etc.) to design computer programs that can identify most (85%) genes.- So many genes have already been cloned that "new" genes can be predicted by similarity to known genes (even from other species).- If ESTs (cDNAs) were sequenced, can check for similarity to chromosome sequence. "BLAST" Review of Unit 10-1 1. Sequencing genomes: how and why Shotgun approach vs ordered clone approach Assembly is computationally challenging 1. What do you do with a genome sequence?...
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This note was uploaded on 06/17/2010 for the course BIOLOGY Bio 107A taught by Professor Zarate during the Spring '09 term at UC Riverside.

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Unit 10-2handout - Please complete course evaluations for...

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