Congress - Congress Chapter 6 In this chapter we will learn...

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Congress Chapter 6
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In this chapter we will learn about the clash between representation and lawmaking the powers and responsibilities of Congress congressional membership and elections the organization of Congress the rules of congressional operation
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Representation and lawmaking Representation: the efforts by elected officials to look out for the interests of those who elect them Lawmaking: the creation of policy to address the problems and needs of the entire nation
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The conflict between representation and lawmaking Local good different from national good, and members favor representing their local constituencies Difficult for members to fulfill their collective responsibility of national lawmaking Explains why Americans hate Congress as a whole but love their own senators and representatives
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Four kinds of representation Policy representation: congressional work to advance the issues and ideological preferences of constituents Allocative representation: congressional work to secure projects, services, and funds for the represented district Pork barrel: public works projects and grants for specific districts paid for by general revenues
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Four kinds of representation, cont’d. Casework: legislative work on behalf of individual constituents to solve their problems with government agencies and programs Symbolic representation: efforts of members of Congress to stand for American ideals or identify with common constituency values
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Powers of the House vs. Senate Bicameral legislature: legislature with two chambers Constitutional differences Term length, age, apportionment, treaties, appointments, etc. Organizational differences Size, number of committees, Rules Committee, limits on debate Electoral differences Campaign spending
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Differences between the House and Senate House Senate Constitutional Differences
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Congress - Congress Chapter 6 In this chapter we will learn...

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