Constitution - The Politics of the American Founding...

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The Politics of the American Founding Chapter 2
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In this chapter we will learn about the colonial break with England and the Revolution the initial attempt at American government--the Articles of Confederation the Constitutional Convention the Constitution itself the ratification of the Constitution
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Conflict between England and the colonies Why England believed it was right: Wanted colonists to help pay for the French and Indian War Colonists rejected offers of representation in Parliament Why the colonists believed they were right: Unfair taxation, such as the Sugar and Tea Acts Tyrannical monarch Belief in popular sovereignty
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The Declaration of Independence Jefferson is influenced by Locke’s belief in natural rights (life, liberty, and property) He argues that King George has violated the social contract with the colonists Jefferson must make the case why this revolution is just, but others are not
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Life after the Revolution African Americans Remained enslaved in the South Slave trade continued Native Americans Continued to lose land Women Lost the ability to vote and the previous limited opportunities to participate in politics
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The Articles of Confederation Established a “firm league of friendship” Created a confederacy giving power to the states Federal government had few powers and limited ability to carry out those powers
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Provisions of the Articles A national government with a Congress empowered to make peace, coin money, appoint officers for an army, control the post office, and negotiate with Indian tribes One vote in the Continental Congress for each state regardless of size The vote of nine states to pass any measure; amendments had to be unanimous Delegates selected to the Congress by their
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This note was uploaded on 06/18/2010 for the course POL SCI political taught by Professor Any during the Spring '10 term at Ohio State.

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Constitution - The Politics of the American Founding...

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