day11.healthcomm

day11.healthcomm - Health Communications Monday, March 1,...

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Unformatted text preview: Health Communications Monday, March 1, 2010 Epidemic Problem A/B There is a new epidemic, and it will affect 600 people. Choose one: A. 200 people will be saved. OR B. 1/3rd chance 600 people will be saved and 2/3rd chance nobody will be saved. Epidemic Problem C/D There is a new epidemic, and it will affect 600 people. Choose one: C. 400 people will die. OR D. 2/3rd chance 600 people will die and 1/3rd chance nobody will die. Aspects of Health Communications 1. How should you frame your health communication? 2. How can you reduce people’s defensiveness when they hear a scary health communication that pertains to them? 2 Ways to Frame Equivalent Content – Gain frame Emphasizes benefits associated with behaving a certain way. – Loss frame Emphasizes costs associated with not behaving that way. – Gain frame 2 Ways to Frame Equivalent Content Emphasizes benefits associated with behaving a certain way. “An advantage of getting regular mammograms is that you will find tumors early, which will increase treatment options.” – Loss frame Emphasizes costs associated with not behaving that way. “A disadvantage of failing to get regular mammograms is that you won’t find tumors early, which will leave you with fewer treatment options.” Epidemic Problem A/B There is a new epidemic, and it will affect 600 people. Choose one: A. 200 people will be saved. OR B. 1/3rd chance 600 people will be saved and 2/3rd chance nobody will be saved. Epidemic Problem A/B There is a new epidemic, and it will affect 600 people. Choose one: A. 200 people will be saved. OR B. 1/3rd chance 600 people will be saved and 2/3rd chance nobody will be saved. Epidemic Problem C/D There is a new epidemic, and it will affect 600 people. Choose one: C. 400 people will die. OR D. 2/3rd chance 600 people will die and 1/3rd chance nobody will die. Epidemic Problem C/D There is a new epidemic, and it will affect 600 people. Choose one: C. 400 people will die. OR D. 2/3rd chance 600 people will die and 1/3rd chance nobody will die. People Chose A or D A.200 people will be saved. C. 400 people will die. B. 1/3rd chance 600 people will be saved and 2/3rd chance nobody will be saved. D. 2/3rd chance 600 people will die and 1/3rd chance nobody will die. A.200 people will be saved. But A and C are same except for how they are framed (same for B and D) C. 400 people will die. B. 1/3rd chance 600 D. 2/3rd chance 600 people will be people will die and saved and 2/3rd 1/3rd chance nobody chance nobody will will die. be saved. Frames Matter • When framed as gains: Risk-averse • When framed as losses: Risk-seeking Choosing Between Surgery and Another Treatment The doctor says either: A: You have a 32% chance of dying by the end of the year if you have the surgery. OR B: You have a 68% chance of living for longer than one year if you have the surgery. Choosing Between Surgery and Another Treatment The doctor says either: Loss Frame A: You have a 32% chance of dying by the end of the year if you have the surgery. OR Gain Frame B: You have a 68% chance of living for longer than one year if you have the surgery. Message Framing and Health Behaviors • Illness Detection Behaviors – e.g., mammogram, HIV test – Potential for losses – Might find a disease – Risk-seeking • Health Promotion Behaviors – e.g., exercise, getting a vaccine – Potential for gains – May prevent an illness – Risk-averse Message Framing and Health Behaviors • Illness Detection Behaviors – Loss Frame Better – e.g., mammogram, HIV test – Potential for losses – Might find a disease – Risk-seeking • Health Promotion Behaviors – e.g., exercise, getting a vaccine – Potential for gains – May prevent an illness – Risk-averse Message Framing and Health Behaviors • Illness Detection Behaviors – Loss Frame Better – e.g., mammogram, HIV test – Potential for losses – Might find a disease – Risk-seeking • Health Promotion Behaviors – Gain Frame Better – e.g., exercise, getting a vaccine – Potential for gains – May prevent an illness – Risk-averse Mouth Rinse Study • Subjects read about a: – health promotion behavior OR – an illness detection behavior. • Information is: – Loss-framed OR – Gain-framed • Measure: Do they take a free sample of the product they read about? Mouth Rinse Study Health Promotion Behavior: “Mouth Rinse” Illness Detection Behavior: “Disclosing Rinse” Gain: Using this enhances your ability to detect plaque. Loss: Not using this limits your ability to detect plaque. Gain: If you use this you take advantage of a way to reduce plaque. Loss: If you do not use this you are failing to take advantage of a way to reduce plaque. Percent of Subjects Requesting a Sample of the Mouth Rinse Health-Promotion Illness Detection Message Framing and Type of Person Which phrase better characterizes you? A. When I see an opportunity for something I like, I get excited right away. A. I worry about making mistakes. You Are ApproachOriented… …If you chose A (“When I see an opportunity for something I like, I get excited right away”). Approach-oriented people are people who actively seek out positive and good things. You Are AvoidanceOriented… …If you chose B (“I worry about making mistakes”). Avoidance-oriented people are people who actively try to avoid negative things. Message Framing and Type of Person • Approach Oriented People: Should prefer a gain-framed message. • Avoidance Oriented People: Should prefer a loss-framed message. • Step 1: Measure approach/avoidance orientation • Step 2: Read either gain-framed or loss-framed message about flossing Message Framing and Type of Person • Step 3: Sent home with 7 individually-wrapped flosses • Step 4: Return 1 week later and report flossing behavior Gain-Framed Message Loss-Framed Message • Step 1: Measure approach/avoidance orientation • Step 2: Read either gain-framed or loss-framed message about flossing Message Framing and Type of Person • Step 3: Sent home with 7 individually-wrapped flosses • Step 4: Return 1 week later and report flossing behavior Message Framing and Type of Person Sherman, Mann & Updegraff (2006, Motivation and Emotion) Aspects of Health Communications 1. How should you frame your health communication? 2. How can you reduce people’s defensiveness when they hear a health communication that pertains to them? Paradox of Personal Relevance The people for whom the information is most relevant... …are the people who are least accepting of the information. Self-Affirmation Theory The goal of the self-system is to maintain global self-integrity. Self-image: competent, worthy, and adaptive person Health Family Religion School How do people respond to threatening health information? • Change their health behavior • Deny the health information • Affirm the self in alternative domain Self-image: competent, worthy, and adaptive person Health Family Religion School How do people respond to threatening health information? • Change their health behavior • Deny the health information • Affirm the self in alternative domain Self-image: competent, worthy, and adaptive person Health Family Religion School AIDS Education Motivational components of AIDS educational interventions include videos depicting sexually active young people with the disease Yet, AIDS educational videos have been shown to prompt defensive risk assessments Reducing Defensiveness I Ss: sexually active undergraduates Step 1. Subjects write affirmation essay or not. Step 2. Subjects watch video about AIDS in young people. Step 3. Measure risk for HIV and whether they take condoms. Reducing Defensiveness II Ss: 60 female undergraduates who indicated they were coffee-drinkers or non-coffeedrinkers Step 1: Affirm self or not Step 2: Read threatening coffee article Step 3: Measure acceptance of information and intentions to change behavior. ...
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This note was uploaded on 06/19/2010 for the course PSY 3206 taught by Professor Howell during the Spring '10 term at Minnesota.

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