Chapter 2 - Chapter2:Atoms,Molecules,&Ions 1.

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    1. Three Laws of Chemistry that Led to the Atomic Theory a. The Law of Conservation of Mass b. The Law of Definite Proportions c. The law of Multiple Proportions 2. Dalton’s Atomic Theory 3. Experiments that Led to the Nuclear Model of the Atom a. Discovery of the electron: Thomson’s Cathode Ray Tubes b. The charge on one electron: Milliken’s Oil Drop Experiment c. Discovery of the Nucleus: Rutherford’s Gold Foil Experiment 4. Modern Atomic Theory 5. Molecules and Ions 6. The Periodic Table of the Elements 7. Inorganic Nomenclature
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    History of Atomic Theory     History of Atomic Theory Handout
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  Example 1     An antacid tablet weighing 0.853 g reacted with an  acid solution weighing 56.52 g.  One of the reaction  products was carbon dioxide gas which was  observed as a fizz.  If the resulting solution weighed  57.15 g, how many grams of carbon dioxide were  produced?     Answer:  0.22 g
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This note was uploaded on 06/21/2010 for the course CHEM 11 taught by Professor Scholefield during the Spring '08 term at Santa Monica.

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Chapter 2 - Chapter2:Atoms,Molecules,&Ions 1.

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