ENVE331-SP10 - Wetlands Lecture

ENVE331-SP10 - Wetlands Lecture - Natural and Engineered...

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Natural and Engineered WETLANDS Importance of natural wetlands and use of constructed wetlands: ± 1. Natural Wetlands Important ecological resource Require protection ± 2. Constructed Wetlands Wastewater Treatment Storm Water Treatment Inexpensive and Environmentally friendly
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± Transitional lands between aquatic and terrestrial environments ± Water table is at or near the surface ± Federal definition: a region that is submerged by at least one inch of water 21 days per year ± Many other state and federal definitions Important for permitting and mitigation See readings ± Examples: Coastal: Salt marshes, mudflats Inland freshwater: marshes, swamps, bogs What is a wetland?
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± Flood control ± Groundwater regeneration ± Water purification Nutrient removal Sediment capture Aerobic/anaerobic degradation ± Important wildlife habitat Biological diversity (fish, birds, reptiles amphibians) 45% of all endangered species in the U.S. live in estuaries. ± Recreation What’s the big deal about wetlands?
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Sacramento Delta - Floodplain
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± Wetlands were originally considered useless, unproductive land, and were drained for various reasons: Agriculture (drain tiling) Development (residential, commercial, industrial) Disease control (reduce mosquito habitat) ± Example: Mangrove swamps. 80% of all sea life has part of its life-cycle in mangrove swamps. Mangroves are being drained for development and aquaculture. Millions of acres of mangrove swamps have been drained for
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This note was uploaded on 06/22/2010 for the course ENVE 331 taught by Professor Vigil during the Spring '08 term at Cal Poly.

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ENVE331-SP10 - Wetlands Lecture - Natural and Engineered...

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