Chapter11 - 70-270: MCSE Guide to Microsoft Windows XP...

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Unformatted text preview: 70-270: MCSE Guide to Microsoft Windows XP ProfessionalSecond Edition, EnhancedChapter 11: Windows XP Professional Application SupportGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced2ObjectivesUnderstand the Windows XP Professional system architectureDeploy Win32 applicationsFine-tune the application environment for DOS and the virtual DOS machineFine-tune the application environment for Win16Work with Windows application management facilitiesGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced3Windows XP Professional System ArchitectureComponents:Environment subsystemExecutive ServicesSubsystem:Operating environment Emulates another operating systemKernel modecomponents Permitted to access system objects and resources directlyGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced4Kernel Mode Versus User ModeMain difference:Memory usageUser mode:Each process perceives entire 4 GB of virtual memory as its exclusive propertyUpper 2 GB reserved for operating system useAddress space entirely virtualProcesses may share memory areas with other processesGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced5Kernel Mode Versus User Mode (continued)User mode:One user mode process cannot crash anotherProcesses cannot access hardware or communicate with other processes directlyKernel mode:May access all hardware and memory in computerAll operations share the same memory spaceOne kernel mode function can corrupt anothers data Can cause the operating system to crashGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced6Processes and ThreadsProcess:Defines operating environment in which application or any major operating system component runsIncludes:Own private memory spaceSet of security descriptorsPriority level for execution Processor-affinity dataList of threadsGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced7Processes and Threads (continued)Thread:Basic executable unit in Windows XPEvery process includes at least one threadConsists of:Placeholder information associated with single use of any program that can handle multiple concurrent users or activitiesAssociated with processes Do not exist independentlyGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced8Processes and Threads (continued)Applications must be explicitly designed to take advantage of threadingProcesses can create other processesCalled child processesChild processes can inherit some of the characteristics and parameters of their parent processGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced9Processes and Threads (continued)ContextCurrent collection of Registry values and runtime environment variables in which a process or thread runsGuide to MCSE 70-270, Second Edition, Enhanced10Environment SubsystemsWindows XP Professional Offers support for various application platforms...
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This note was uploaded on 06/22/2010 for the course CIT 601 taught by Professor Reems during the Spring '10 term at University of Tennessee.

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Chapter11 - 70-270: MCSE Guide to Microsoft Windows XP...

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