WagnerT&I - Richard Wagner (1813-1883) What is...

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Unformatted text preview: Richard Wagner (1813-1883) What is Opera? Play/drama set to music; typically entirely sung Recitative Aria Duet Ensemble Diegetic music/non-diegetic music Tristan und Isolde Act I: Isolde (from Ireland) is on a ship having forcibly been taken by Tristan to marry King Marke. Isolde had previously met Tristan when he had been severely wounded in a fight in Ireland and she cared for him using the traditional medicines of her family. He had killed her betrothed and sent her his severed head as an act of defiance. (But she doesnt recognize him at first. ) She feels betrayed on board the ship. (It is clear that she is in love with him). Isolde wants to commit suicide and asks her servant Brangne to bring her the death potion she keeps with her other medicinals. She demands to see Tristan and says they should drink a toast. Tristan senses it is a death potion. They both drink, but Brangne had brought the love potion instead of the death potion. They fall madly in love. Act II: Love scene between Tristan and Isolde. At end of act they are discovered by King Marke and Tristan is mortally wounded. Act III: Tristan lies barely conscious waiting for Isolde at his castle, where he has been brought by his friend Kurwenal. She arrives; Tristan dies in her arms, and she falls transfigured, following him in death. Act I Scene I Sailor : Westward strays the eye, eastward flies our ship. Fresh blows the wind homeward: my Irish maid, where do you linger? Is it the breath of your sighs, that fills our sails? Blow, blow, o wind! Woe, ah woe, my child, my Irish maid, you headstrong, winsome maid! Isolde : Who dares mock me? Brangne speak! Where are we? Brangne: Blue streaks arise in the west; the ship sails smooth and swift: on this calm sea, by evening we shall safely reach land. Isolde : What land?...
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This note was uploaded on 06/24/2010 for the course MUSIC 128 taught by Professor Bithell,d during the Fall '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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WagnerT&I - Richard Wagner (1813-1883) What is...

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