Elec Field I - PHY 2049C General Physics B Fields,...

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PHY 2049C – General Physics B Fields, Circuits, Waves, Light Today: 1) Charges and Forces 2) Electric Fields
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Course Outline 1.) Electrostatic Forces, Fields, Energy Ch. 20-23 2.) Electric Current, DC Circuits Ch.24,25 3.) Magnetic Field, Magnetostatic Forces Ch.26 4.) Changing Fields: Magnetic Induction, AC Circuits, Ch. 27,28 5.) Maxwell's equations, Electromagnetic Waves = Light, Ch 29 6.) Properties of Light, Ch 30 7.) Optical Images, Ch 31 8.) Interference of light-waves, Ch 32
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Important Points from Last Lecture
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Important Points from Last Lecture
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Example A positively charged object is placed close to a conducting object attached to an insulating glass pedestal ( a ). After the opposite side of the conductor is grounded for a short time interval ( b ), the conductor becomes negatively charged ( c ). Based on this information, we can conclude that within the conductor 1. both positive and negative charges move freely. 2. only negative charges move freely. 3. only positive charges move freely. 4. We can’t really conclude anything.
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Example Three pithballs are suspended from thin threads. Various objects are then rubbed against other objects (nylon against silk, glass against polyester, etc.) and each of the pithballs is charged by touching them with one of these objects. It is found that pithballs 1 and 2 repel each other and that pithballs 2 and 3 repel each other. From this we can conclude that 1. 1 and 3 carry charges of opposite sign. 2. 1 and 3 carry charges of equal sign. 3. all three carry the charges of the same sign. 4. one of the objects carries no charge. 5. we need to do more experiments to determine the sign of the charges.
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Example Three pithballs are suspended from thin threads. Various objects are then rubbed against other objects (nylon against silk, glass against polyester, etc.) and each of the pithballs is charged by touching them with one of these objects. It is found that pithballs 1 and 2 attract each other and that pithballs 2 and 3 repel each other. From this we can conclude that 1. 1 and 3 carry charges of opposite sign.
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Elec Field I - PHY 2049C General Physics B Fields,...

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