Celestial Motions

Celestial Motions - Celestial Motions Chapter 2 Fig. 2.1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2 Celestial Motions
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fig. 2.1
Background image of page 2
The Celestial Sphere The Celestial Sphere To understand the idea of the celestial sphere first think of the earth in space. The stars all around us look as if they could be on the inside of a huge distant sphere. Even though the stars are really at different distances this idea of the celestial sphere is very useful for getting positions on the sky. Now imagine you are close to the north pole . Here it is like being on a rowing boat, because the earth is spinning on its axis once a day. Every day, each star circles all around you and around the point overhead, which is the celestial north pole. There is of course a celestial south pole as well and the celestial equator circles the sky half way between the poles. Positions on the celestial sphere are specified by two coordinates. Declination , like latitude on earth is measured in degrees north or south of the celestial equator. Positive declinations are north of the celestial equator, negative declinations are south of the equator.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/29/2010 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Roberts during the Summer '08 term at FSU.

Page1 / 32

Celestial Motions - Celestial Motions Chapter 2 Fig. 2.1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online