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Affirmative Action - Affi r mative Action T hi s photo...

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This photo shows a typical day at the office in today’s day and age. (n.d.). I mmigrants Must Adapt. http://www.redroom.com (n.d.). Immigrants Must Adapt . Retrieved September 20, 2009, from http://www.redroom.com Affirmative Action 1 Affirmative Action: Do We Still Need it? Mariah Chavez Axia College of University of Phoenix Affirmative Action: Do We Still Need It?
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Affirmative Action 2 Discrimination today is almost non- existent compared to fifty years ago. Affirmative Action was designed to help minorities prosper in a racist world. Today, Affirmative Action still exists. Even though some say affirmative action is still needed due to unfair educational opportunities, it is no longer necessary because it has achieved its purpose to close the achievement gap in both education and employment and it has come so far that our president is African American. My question to you is: Do we still need Affirmative Action? “The words "affirmative action" were first uttered at a meeting in 1962 at Vice President Lyndon Johnson's Texas ranch. Johnson suddenly leaned forward dramatically, staring James Farmer directly in the eye, and asked him what he suggested be done to help blacks obtain full equality with whites? ‘What I'm proposing,’ Farmer, founder of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), answered without hesitation, ‘is that as a matter of policy in employment, we replace color blindness with color consciousness aimed at eliminating inequities based on color ... in a word, what I'm proposing is a policy of 'Compensatory Preferential Treatment' similar to that used with veterans.’ To his delight, Farmer noted that Johnson reacted with great enthusiasm. ‘I guess you can't expect a fellow to compete in a race when the fellow he's running against is halfway down the field, while he is still standing at the starting line,’ Johnson replied.
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Affirmative Action 3 The Vice President, however, had a problem with the phrase ‘Compensatory Preferential Treatment.’ ‘That's a terrible name,’ he told Farmer. ‘We can't call it that. Let's see, what can we call it? We have to move the nation forward, act positively, affirmatively. That's it: Affirmative Action!’” (Beauford, 2005, para. 1).
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