EN Adoption Packet BOS VOL1b Part2

EN Adoption Packet BOS VOL1b Part2 - Case No....

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Unformatted text preview: Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Exhibit II-2A Proposed General Plan Amendments Resolution SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING COMMISSION RESOLUTION NO. 17662 WHEREAS, Section 4.105 of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco mandates that the Planning Commission shall periodically recommend to the Board of Supervisors for approval or rejection of proposed amendments to the General Plan. The San Francisco Planning Department is seeking to implement the four Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans, comprised of the East South of Market, the Mission, the Central Waterfront and the Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plans, which seek to reduce land use conflicts between industry and other competing uses, such as office and housing in areas designated as Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR); retain existing jobs in the area; and encourage diverse and affordable housing, mixed-used areas, and complete neighborhoods. On February12th 2004, the Planning Commission established by Resolution 16727 interim policies and procedures (hereinafter "Interim Policies") for development proposals in sections of the Eastern Neighborhoods; which replaced the interim policies established by Resolution 16202 in August 2001 where there was overlap. The approval of the Eastern Neighborhoods General Plan and Planning Code Amendments would supersede both Resolutions by establishing permanent policies and controls for the Eastern Neighborhoods Areas, excluding the area now called "West SoMa," which is undergoing a separate process. The Mission, Central Waterfront, East South of Market and Showplace Square/Potrero Hill neighborhoods are places where much of the City's industriallyzoned land is found. For the last 10 to 15 years, these neighborhoods have been changing and have seen growing land use conflicts, where residential and office development has begun to compete with industrial uses. Resolving these difficult questions with an emphasis on balance -- is at the heart of the Eastern Neighborhoods Program. The Eastern Neighborhoods community planning process began in 2001 with the goal of developing new zoning controls for the industrial portions of these neighborhoods. A series of workshops were conducted in each area where stakeholders articulated goals for their neighborhood, considered how new zoning might Page 1 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans promote these goals, and created several rezoning options representing variations on the amount of industrial land to retain for employment and business activity. These proposed zoning alternatives were presented to the Planning Commission on March 3, 2003 in the report titled Community Planning in the Eastern Neighborhoods: Rezoning Options Workbook. In February 2004, the Planning Commission established interim policies patterned after Option B for East SoMa, the Mission, and Showplace Square/Potrero (Resolution 16727). Starting in 2005, the community planning process expanded to address other issues critical to these communities including affordable housing, transportation, parks and open space, urban design, and community facilities. The Planning Department began working with the neighborhood stakeholders to create Area Plans for each neighborhood to articulate a vision for the future. The planning process resulted in four Area Plans, as listed above, which contain policies and proposals, including those for land use, urban design, housing, economic development, transportation, community facilities and historic preservation. Work products from this process have included, but are not limited to: Profiles of Community Planning Areas: San Francisco's Eastern Neighborhoods (January 2002), Industrial Land in San Francisco: Understanding Production, Distribution, and Repair (July 2002), Community Planning in the Eastern Neighborhoods: Rezoning Options Workbook (February 2003), Supply/Demand Study for Production, Distribution, and Repair (PDR) in San Francisco's Eastern Neighborhoods (EPS, April 2005), Eastern Neighborhoods Proposed Permanent Zoning Controls: An Overview (October 2005) and San Francisco's Eastern Neighborhoods Rezoning Socioeconomic Impacts Assessment Report (2007). While these studies have been ongoing, the Planning Commission has adopted several Resolutions establishing interim policies and controls to preserve land for industrial uses, including Resolution 14861 (June 1999) that established Industrial Protection Zones in various locations in the City's Eastern Neighborhoods, and Resolution 16202 that carried forth the intent and objectives of these controls and policies (August 2001). Furthermore, by Resolution No. 20-07, the Board of Supervisors established City and County of San Francisco Policy for the Eastern Neighborhoods Rezoning and Community Area Plans, which overall calls for the Area Plans to be consistent with the General Plan; to facilitate affordable housing production; to protect and provide open space, transit, mixed-use neighborhood commercial retail; to protect Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR) businesses, building and space; to protect and promote arts venues spaces; to protect landmarks; and to provide an array of public benefits to mitigate the impact of new development. Page 2 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans The Draft Area Plans, together with the General Plan Revisions, provide a comprehensive set of policies and implementation programming to realize the vision for the four Eastern Neighborhoods, including an overall land use plan, which balances the land use goals of permitting housing development in industrially zoned areas while protecting an adequate supply of land for PDR, a strategy for encouraging housing affordable to range of city residents, an overall heights plan together with a strategy for specific urban design standards and for preservation of historic resources, an economic development strategy for local jobs and local business assistance, a framework to guide the implementation of street and transportation improvements, as well as for open space amenities and community facilities. Overall, policies envisioned for the four Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans would be consistent with the General Plan. However, a number of amendments to the General Plan, attached in an Ordinance hereto as Exhibit II-3A including the addition of the East South of Market, Mission, Central Waterfront and Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plans and revisions to other Elements, Area Plans and the Land Use Index of the General Plan are required to achieve the vision and goals for the Eastern Neighborhoods. The City Attorney's Office has reviewed the draft ordinance (II-3) and approved it as to form. On April 17, 2008, pursuant to Planning Code Section 340(c), the Planning Commission approved Resolution No. 17585, a Resolution of intention to initiate amendments to the General Plan. Subsequent to adopting Res. No. 17585, the Planning Commission authorized the Department to provide appropriate notice for a series of public hearings on the proposed amendment. The Commission held a series of public hearings to consider the proposed amendment and to receive public comment, including hearings on May 15, 2008, May 22, 2008, June 5, 2008, June 12, 2008, June 19, 2008, June 26, 2008, July 3, 2008 July 10, 2008, July 24, 2008, July 31, 2008 and August 7, 2008. In response to the public and the Planning Commission during the approval hearings the staff has prepared and incorporated changes to the proposed General Plan amendments and the Area Plans as contained in the staff report attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. The Planning Commission hereby directs staff to work in consultation with the City Attorney's office to make these changes and any additional changes that the Commission specifically identifies as part of its approval action, to be forwarded to the Board of Supervisors. Staff recommends adoption of the draft resolution adopting amendments to the General Plan, which includes adding four new Area Plans - the Mission, East SoMa, Central Waterfront and Showplace Square/Potero Hill Area Plans, and making related amendments to the Commerce and Industry and the Recreation and Open Space Elements, the South of Market Area Plan, the Northeastern Waterfront Area Plan, the Central Waterfront Area Plan and the Land Use Index. Page 3 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Each of the Area Plans articulates a holistic vision for the neighborhood. The Plans encourage the development of new housing, in particular housing affordable to a range of City residents, while protecting an adequate supply of land and buildings for PDR employment and businesses. The Plans will ensure that new development is directed to the appropriate places and will help resolve land use conflict in these areas. The Area Plans support the General Plan's vision of building where transit and services can accommodate growth; encouraging public transit use over trips by private automobile; expanding housing opportunities along neighborhood commercial, mixeduse, transit and existing residential areas; strengthening neighborhood-serving commercial areas; maintaining our diverse economic base by protecting our industrial and service sectors from displacement as well as by providing adequate space for different economic activities; preserving landmarks and historic buildings as well as integrating good urban design standards for new development; and providing and improving open space, community facilities and streets and transportation in the neighborhoods. The Plans lay the policy foundation for additional changes that are detailed in the Planning Code, Zoning Map and other implementation measures. The following Key Principles inform all the objectives and policies contained in the Plans: People and Neighborhoods: 1) Encourage new housing at appropriate locations and make it as affordable as possible to a range of City residents 2) Plan for transportation, open space, community facilities and other critical elements of complete neighborhoods The Economy and Jobs: 3) Reserve sufficient space for production, distribution and repair activities, in order to support the City's economy and provide good jobs for residents 4) Take steps to provide space for new industries that bring innovation and flexibility to the City's economy In addition, a detailed implementation program that leverages funding for public improvements from new private development, existing funding streams, and innovative community strategies will accompany the Area Plans. Page 4 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Planning Code Section 101.1(b) establishes eight priority policies and is a basis by which differences between competing policies in the General Plan are resolved. The project is consistent with the eight priority policies in that: 1. That existing neighborhood serving retail uses be preserved and enhanced and future opportunities for resident employment in or ownership of such businesses enhanced. The Area Plans will preserve and enhance neighborhood serving retail uses. The Plans support existing and new retail commerce by encouraging ground floor retail in commercial areas and through a number of proposed improvements to the pedestrian realm. New development, enabled by the Eastern Neighborhoods Plans, will enhance the neighborhood commercial districts along Mission Street and Valencia Street in the Mission, 6th Street in the East SoMa, and in the mixed-used areas of the neighborhoods providing potential employment and ownership opportunities for San Francisco residents. The proposed amendments will support the creation of new housing units in mixed-used areas, provide a market for increased retail uses along these corridors and allow expansion of the customer base for neighborhood serving businesses. In addition, the Plans direct the Planning Department to work closely with the Mayor's Office of Economic and Workforce Development and other relevant City agencies to ensure economic development programs and policies are in place to protect and promote small, existing business and to support and provide employment and skills training for residents. 2. That existing housing and neighborhood character be conserved and protected in order to preserve the cultural and economic diversity of our neighborhoods. The Plans protect and enhance the existing neighborhood character by applying appropriate height and bulk limits, protecting landmark and other historic buildings, reinforcing neighborhood commercial districts, preserving and enhancing cultural and community institutions, and detailing key design principles. The proposed height and bulk controls emphasize consistency with current development patterns and focus on protecting sunlight access for streets and alleyways. 3. That the City's supply of affordable housing be preserved and enhanced. Page 5 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans The Plans will have a positive effect on the City's affordable housing stock. They will enable the creation of new housing units in all four of the neighborhoods; positively affecting the City's housing supply. The Eastern Neighborhoods proposals would result in about 7,500 to 10,000 new housing units over the next 20 years. Projections estimate that approximately 30% of these units will be below market rate and affordable to a range of incomes, including units provided for very low and low income households, moderate income households, and middle-income households. The Plans reflect a variety of strategies to ensure that a substantial portion of new housing is affordable to individuals or families with a range of incomes. These strategies include: 1) effective use of existing tools and funding streams to dedicate revenue for affordable housing towards the Plans' Areas; 2) identifying new funding sources for affordable housing within the Plans' Areas such as an impact fee, tax increment, and new sources of dedicated City revenue; and 3) establishing new zoning districts in formerly industrial areas that require a deeper level of affordability in housing development. In areas where there will be no upzoning, projects with over five units will still be subject to produce 15 to 20 percent of these units as permanently affordable pursuant to the City's existing inclusionary housing requirement. Additional mechanisms to ensure permanent housing affordability include preservation of existing housing stock, unbundling parking from housing, and flexibility in density controls. 4. That commuter traffic not impede MUNI transit service or overburden our streets or neighborhood parking. The Plans would not result in commuter traffic impeding Muni transit service or overburdening the streets or neighborhood parking. To mitigate the impacts of traffic that new residents and employees create, the Plans support improvements to an already strong existing public transit infrastructure. The Plans support the design and implementation of transit service improvements to increase Muni's speed, reliability and ridership. New parking requirements are designed to discourage private automobile trips in areas highly accessible by public transit. In addition, the Plans contain policies and recommendations aimed at reducing congestion by promoting walking, bicycling, car-sharing and transportation demand management programs. 5. That a diverse economic base be maintained by protecting our industrial and service sectors from displacement due to commercial Page 6 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans office development, and that future opportunities for resident employment and ownership in these sectors be enhanced. On balance, the Plans would not inappropriately affect the industrial sector or service sectors. In the Plans, these sectors are referred to as production, distribution, and repair (PDR) businesses and services. Compared to existing zoning, the Plans would protect PDR businesses and activities by restricting competing uses and creating clearer land use controls throughout the non-residential districts of the Plans' Areas. Specifically, as compared to existing code requirements, new provisions limiting office development in industrial and mixed-use areas will help curtail displacement due to commercial office development. The Plans direct the Planning Department to work with the Mayor's Office of Economic and Workforce Development to develop and strengthen programs to attract appropriate businesses in these sectors and train workers for employment in them. 6. That the City achieves the greatest possible preparedness to protect against injury and loss of life in an earthquake. The Plans would not adversely affect preparedness against injury and loss of life in an earthquake and would comply with applicable safety standards. New residential buildings would be subject to the City's Building Code, Fire Code and other applicable safety standards. 7. That landmarks and historic buildings be preserved. The Plans would not adversely affect on the preservation of landmarks and historic buildings. The four Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans call for the protection of existing landmarks and historic buildings and establish interim policies for their preservation, while full historic surveys of the plan areas are completed to ensure that no historic resources are in conflict with the Plans. The plans strengthen protection for historic resources and potential historic districts. 8. That our parks and open space and their access to sunlight and vistas be protected from development. The Plans would have a positive effect on parks and open space, and would not adversely affect existing open spaces or their access to sunlight and vistas. The Plans include recommendations for a series of open space improvements: a new neighborhood park in each of the four neighborhoods, as well as the addition of open space amenities to Page 7 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans sidewalks, streets and alleys. Additionally, the controls have a focus on protecting sunlight access for streets and alleyways and increasing open space requirements where they are currently deficient. The Eastern Neighborhoods planning process built on existing General Plan policies. Analysis of applicable General Plan Objectives and Policies has determined that the proposed action is, on balance, consistent with the General Plan as it is proposed to be amended. The proposed actions offer a compelling articulation and implementation of many of the concepts outlined in the General Plan, especially the Residence, Housing, Air Quality, Urban Design, Commerce and Industry, Transportation, Recreation and Open Space, and Arts Elements. New Area Plans' policies and zoning controls formulate these directive policies with specific consideration for the neighborhood conditions of the Eastern Neighborhoods. Below are specific policies and objectives that support the proposed actions. NOTE: General Plan Elements are in CAPITAL, BOLDED ITALICS General Plan Objectives are in CAPITAL LETTERS General Plan Policies are in Arial standard font Key Polices and Objectives are Bolded Staff comments are in italics 1990 RESIDENCE ELEMENT The Area Plans contain policies and call for land use controls that would encourage new, well-designed housing development that conserves neighborhood character; retain and enhance existing housing; provide opportunities for higher density housing near transit; and reduce the cost of building housing through various strategies such as unbundling parking requirements from housing. The Plans also would encourage below-market rate housing throughout the Planning Areas, affordable to a range of incomes. In addition, the proposed controls and policies would increase the housing supply without overcrowding or adversely affecting the prevailing character of the existing neighborhoods. The removal of density limits in some areas is replaced by bedroom unit-mix requirements as well as clear set-backs and open space requirements. OBJECTIVE 1 TO PROVIDE NEW HOUSING, ESPECIALLY PERMANENTLY AFFORDABLE HOUSING, IN APPROPRIATE LOCATIONS WHICH MEETS IDENTIFIED HOUSING NEEDS AND TAKES INTO ACCOUNT THE DEMAND FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING CREATED BY EMPLOYMENT GROWTH POLICY 1.1 Promote development of permanently affordable housing on surplus, underused and vacant public lands. Page 8 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans POLICY 1.2 Facilitate the conversion of underused industrial and commercial areas to residential use, giving preference to permanently affordable housing uses. POLICY 1.4 Locate infill housing on appropriate sites in established neighborhoods. POLICY 1.5 Allow new secondary units in areas where their effects can be dealt with and there is neighborhood support, especially if that housing is made permanently affordable to lower income households. POLICY 1.6 Discourage development of new housing in areas unsuitable for residential occupancy, or on sites containing existing housing worthy of retention. POLICY 1.8 Encourage construction of new single room occupancy residential hotels. POLICY 2.2 Encourage higher residential density in areas adjacent to downtown, in underutilized commercial and industrial areas proposed for conversion to housing, and in neighborhood commercial districts where higher density will not have harmful effects, especially if the higher density provides a significant number of units that are permanently affordable to lower income households. POLICY 2.3 Allow flexibility in the number and size of units within permitted volumes of larger multi unit structures, especially if the flexibility results in creation of a significant number of dwelling units that are permanently affordable to lower income households. OBJECTIVE 3 TO RETAIN THE EXISTING SUPPLY OF HOUSING. POLICY 3.1 Discourage the demolition of sound existing housing. POLICY 3.2 Control the merger of residential units. POLICY 3.3 Consider legalization of existing illegal secondary units where there is neighborhood support and the units can conform to minimum Code standards of safety and livability and the permanent affordability of the units is assured. POLICY 3.4 Restrict the conversion of rental housing to condominiums or other forms of tenure or occupancy. POLICY 3.7 Preserve the existing stock of residential hotels. OBJECTIVE 5 TO MAINTAIN AND IMPROVE THE PHYSICAL CONDITION OF HOUSING WHILE MAINTAINING EXISTING AFFORDABILITY LEVELS. POLICY 5.5 Preserve landmark and historic residential buildings. OBJECTIVE 6 TO IMPROVE THE CITYWIDE AFFORDABLE HOUSING DELIVERY SYSTEM. Page 9 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans POLICY 6.1 Reorganize and coordinate governmental activity related to affordable housing POLICY 6.4 Create greater public awareness of the affordable housing problem and support for affordable housing. OBJECTIVE 7 TO INCREASE LAND AND IMPROVE BUILDING RESOURCES FOR PERMANENTLY AFFORDABLE HOUSING. POLICY 7.1 Create more housing opportunity sites for permanently affordable housing. POLICY 7.2 Include affordable units in larger housing projects. POLICY 7.4 Promote more economical housing construction to achieve affordable housing. POLICY 7.5 Encourage energy efficiency in new residential development and weatherization in existing housing to reduce overall housing costs. POLICY 7.7 Allow construction of unconventional housing types that reduce cost, if quality can be maintained. OBJECTIVE 8 TO EXPAND FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR PERMANENTLY AFFORDABLE HOUSING POLICY 8.1 Enhance existing revenue sources for permanently affordable housing. POLICY 8.2 Create new sources of revenue for permanently affordable housing. POLICY 8.3 Provide new mechanisms to assure long-term financing for permanently affordable housing. POLICY 8.4 Develop greater investment in and support for affordable housing programs by corporations, churches, unions and financial institutions. OBJECTIVE 9 TO IMPROVE THE FOCUS OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAMS POLICY 9.2 Make affordable housing permanently affordable. OBJECTIVE 10 TO PROTECT THE EXISTING AFFORDABILITY OF HOUSING. POLICY 10.1 Preserve affordability of existing affordable units. POLICY 10.2 Protect existing buildings at risk of losing their subsidies or being converted to market rate housing. OBJECTIVE 11 TO ACHIEVE AFFORDABILITY THROUGH VARIOUS FORMS OF OWNERSHIP. Page 10 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans POLICY 11.2 Support new affordable ownership programs. OBJECTIVE 12 TO PROVIDE A QUALITY LIVING ENVIRONMENT. POLICY 12.1 Assure housing is provided with adequate public improvements, services and amenities. POLICY 12.2 Allow appropriate neighborhood-serving commercial activities in residential areas. POLICY 12.4 Promote construction of well designed housing that conserves existing neighborhood character. POLICY 12.5 Relate land use controls to the appropriate scale for new and existing residential areas. OBJECTIVE 13 TO PROVIDE MAXIMUM HOUSING CHOICE. POLICY 13.3 Increase the availability of units suitable for special user groups with special housing needs including large families, the elderly, and the homeless. POLICY 13.5 Encourage economic integration in housing by ensuring that new permanently affordable housing is located in all of the City's neighborhoods, and by requiring that all new large market rate residential developments include affordable units. POLICY 13.7 Expand opportunities for home ownership without significantly diminishing the supply of rental housing. 2004 HOUSING ELEMENT The Area Plans contain policies and call for land use controls that would encourage new, well-designed housing development; retain and enhance existing housing; provide opportunities for higher density housing near transit; and reduce the cost of building housing through various strategies such as unbundling parking requirements from housing. The Plans also would encourage below-market rate housing throughout the Planning Areas, affordable to a range of incomes. OBJECTIVE 1 TO PROVIDE NEW HOUSING, ESPECIALLY PERMANENTLY AFFORDABLE HOUSING, IN APPROPRIATE LOCATIONS WHICH MEETS IDENTIFIED HOUSING NEEDS AND TAKES INTO ACCOUNT THE DEMAND FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING CREATED BY EMPLOYMENT DEMAND. POLICY 1.1 Encourage higher residential density in areas adjacent to downtown, in underutilized commercial and industrial areas proposed for conversion to housing, and in neighborhood commercial districts where higher density will not have harmful effects, Page 11 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans especially if the higher density provides a significant number of units that are affordable to lower income households. Set allowable densities in established residential areas at levels which will promote compatibility with prevailing neighborhood scale and character where there is neighborhood support. POLICY 1.2 Encourage housing development, particularly affordable housing, in neighborhood commercial areas without displacing existing jobs, particularly blue-collar jobs or discouraging new employment opportunities. POLICY 1.3 Identify opportunities for housing and mixed-use districts near downtown and former industrial portions of the City. POLICY 1.4 Locate in-fill housing on appropriate sites in established residential neighborhoods. POLICY 1.5 Support development of affordable housing on surplus public lands. POLICY 1.6 Create incentives for the inclusion of housing, including permanently affordable housing, in new commercial development projects. POLICY 1.8 Allow new secondary units in areas where their effects can be dealt with and there is neighborhood support, especially if that housing is made permanently affordable to lower income households OBJECTIVE 2 RETAIN THE EXISTING SUPPLY OF HOUSING. POLICY 2.1 Discourage the demolition of sound existing housing. POLICY 2.2 Control the merger of residential units to retain existing housing. POLICY 2.3 Restrict the conversion of rental housing to other forms of tenure or occupancy. POLICY 2.4 Retain sound existing housing in commercial and industrial areas. POLICY 2.5 Preserve the existing stock of residential hotels. POLICY 2.6 Consider legalization of existing illegal secondary units where there is neighborhood support and the units can conform to minimum Code standards of safety and livability and the permanent affordability of the units is assured. OBJECTIVE 3 ENHANCE THE PHYSICAL CONDITION AND SAFETY OF HOUSING WITHOUT JEOPARDIZING USE OR AFFORDABILITY. POLICY 3.1 Ensure that existing housing is maintained in a decent, safe, and sanitary condition, without increasing rents or displacing low-income households. POLICY 3.6 Preserve landmark and historic residential buildings. Page 12 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans OBJECTIVE 4 SUPPORT AFFORDABLE HOUSING PRODUCTION BY INCREASING SITE AVAILABILITY AND CAPACITY. POLICY 4.1 Actively identify and pursue opportunity sites for permanently affordable housing. POLICY 4.2 Include affordable units in larger housing projects. POLICY 4.3 Encourage the construction of affordable units for single households in residential hotels and "efficiency" units. POLICY 4.5 Allow greater flexibility in the number and size of units within established building envelopes, potentially increasing the number of affordable units in multi-family structures. POLICY 4.6 Support a greater range of housing types and building techniques to promote more economical housing construction and achieve greater affordable housing production. OBJECTIVE 5 INCREASE THE EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY OF THE CITY'S AFFORDABLE HOUSING PRODUCTION SYSTEM. POLICY 5.3 Create greater public awareness about the quality and character of affordable housing projects and generate community-wide support for new affordable housing. POLICY 5.4 Coordinate governmental activities related to affordable housing. OBJECTIVE 6 PROTECT THE AFFORDABILITY OF EXISTING HOUSING. POLICY 6.1 Protect the affordability of units in existing buildings at risk of losing their subsidies or being converted to market rate housing. POLICY 6.2 Ensure that affordable housing is kept affordable. POLICY 6.4 Achieve permanent affordability through non-profit and limited equity housing ownership and management. POLICY 6.5 Monitor and enforce the affordability of units provided as a condition of approval of housing projects. OBJECTIVE 7 EXPAND THE FINANCIAL RESOURCES AVAILABLE FOR PERMANENTLY AFFORDABLE HOUSING. POLICY 7.1 Enhance existing revenue sources for permanently affordable housing. POLICY 7.2 Create new sources of revenue for permanently affordable housing, including dedicated long-term financing for housing programs. Page 13 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans POLICY 7.3 Develop greater investments in and support for affordable housing programs by corporations, churches, unions, foundations, and financial institutions. OBJECTIVE 8 ENSURE EQUAL ACCESS TO HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES. POLICY 8.1 Encourage sufficient and suitable rental housing opportunities and emphasize permanently affordable units wherever possible. POLICY 8.2 Employ uniform definitions of affordability that accurately reflect the demographics and housing needs of San Franciscans. POLICY 8.4 Encourage greater economic integration within housing projects and throughout San Francisco. POLICY 8.5 Prevent housing discrimination. POLICY 8.10 Encourage the provision of new home ownership opportunities through new construction so that increased owner occupancy does not diminish the supply of rental housing. OBJECTIVE 9 AVOID OR MITIGATE HARDSHIPS IMPOSED BY DISPLACEMENT POLICY 9.2 Offer displaced households the right of first refusal to occupy replacement housing units that are comparable in size, location, cost, and rent control protection. OBJECTIVE 11 IN INCREASING THE SUPPLY OF HOUSING, PURSUE PLACE MAKING AND NEIGHBORHOOD BUILDING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES TO CONTINUE SAN FRANCISCO'S DESIRABLE URBAN FABRIC AND ENHANCE LIVABILITY IN ALL NEIGHBORHOODS. POLICY 11.2 Ensure housing is provided with adequate public improvements, services, and amenities. POLICY 11.3 Encourage appropriate neighborhood-serving commercial activities in residential areas, without causing affordable housing displacement. POLICY 11.10 Include energy efficient features in new residential development and encourage weatherization in existing housing to reduce overall housing costs and the long-range cost of maintenance. URBAN DESIGN ELEMENT The Area Plans would emphasize and reinforce the existing scale and character of the neighborhoods through implementation of design standards, alley controls and architectural guidelines. The Area Plans include policies and guidelines to preserve historic and potentially historic resources. The Plans also encourage a number of Page 14 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans proposed improvements to the pedestrian realm. Proposed height and bulk controls emphasize consistency with current development patterns and focus on protecting sunlight access for streets and alleyways. OBJECTIVE 1: EMPHASIS OF THE CHARACTERISTIC PATTERN WHICH GIVES TO THE CITY AND ITS NEIGHBORHOODS AN IMAGE, A SENSE OF PURPOSE, AND A MEANS OF ORIENTATION. POLICY 1.3 Recognize that buildings, when seen together, produce a total effect that characterizes the city and its districts. POLICY 1.6 Make centers of activity more prominent through design of street features and by other means. POLICY 1.8 Increase the visibility of major destination areas and other points for orientation. POLICY 2.4 Preserve notable landmarks and areas of historic, architectural or aesthetic value, and promote the preservation of other buildings and features that provide continuity with past development. POLICY 2.6 Respect the character of older development nearby in the design of new buildings. POLICY 3.1 Promote harmony in the visual relationships and transitions between new and older buildings. OBJECTIVE 4: IMPROVEMENT OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT TO INCREASE PERSONAL SAFETY, COMFORT, PRIDE AND OPPORTUNITY. POLICY 4.10 Encourage or require the provision of recreation space in private development. POLICY 4.11 Make use of street space and other unused public areas for recreation, particularly in dense neighborhoods, such as those close to downtown, where land for traditional open spaces is more difficult to assemble. POLICY 4.13 Improve pedestrian areas by providing human scale and interest. Page 15 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT A key strategy of the Area Plans is to capitalize on the availability of transit and improve non-auto modes of travel in the neighborhoods. The Plans support improvements to the existing transit infrastructure and encourage a number of proposed improvements to the pedestrian realm. The plans also contain policies and recommendations aimed at reducing congestion by promoting walking, bicycling, car-sharing and transportation demand management programs. POLICY 1.1 Involve citizens in planning and developing transportation facilities and services, and in further defining objectives and policies as they relate to district plans and specific projects. POLICY 1.2 Ensure the safety and comfort of pedestrians throughout the city. POLICY 1.3 Give priority to public transit and other alternatives to the private automobile as the means of meeting San Francisco's transportation needs, particularly those of commuters. POLICY 1.6 Ensure choices among modes of travel and accommodate each mode when and where it its most appropriate. OBJECTIVE 2: USE THE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM AS A MEANS FOR GUIDING DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVING THE ENVIRONMENT. POLICY 2.5 Provide incentives for the use of transit, carpools, vanpools, walking and bicycling and reduce the need for new or expanded automobile and automobile parking facilities. OBJECTIVE 3: MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE SAN FRANCISCO'S POSITION AS A REGIONAL DESTINATION WITHOUT INDUCING A GREATER VOLUME OF THROUGH AUTOMOBILE TRAFFIC. OBJECTIVE 4: MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE SAN FRANCISCO'S POSITION AS THE HUB OF A REGIONAL, CITY-CENTERED TRANSIT SYSTEM. OBJECTIVE 11: ESTABLISH PUBLIC TRANSIT AS THE PRIMARY MODE OF TRANSPORTATION IN SAN FRANCISCO AND AS A MEANS THROUGH WHICH TO GUIDE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVE REGIONAL MOBILITY AND AIR QUALITY. POLICY 11.2 Continue to favor investment in transit infrastructure and services over investment in highway development and other facilities that accommodate the automobile. POLICY 12.1 Develop and implement strategies which provide incentives for individuals to use public transit, ridesharing, bicycling and walking to the best advantage, thereby reducing the number of single occupant auto trips. OBJECTIVE 14: DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT A PLAN FOR OPERATIONAL CHANGES AND LAND USE POLICIES THAT WILL MAINTAIN MOBILITY AND SAFETY DESPITE A RISE IN Page 16 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans TRAVEL DEMAND THAT COULD OTHERWISE RESULT IN SYSTEM CAPACITY DEFICIENCIES. POLICY 14.2 Ensure that traffic signals are timed and phased to emphasize transit, pedestrian, and bicycle traffic as part of a balanced multi-modal transportation system. POLICY 14.3 Improve transit operations by implementing strategies that facilitate and prioritize transit vehicle movement and loading. POLICY 14.4 Reduce congestion by encouraging alternatives to the single occupant auto through the reservation of right-of-way and enhancement of other facilities dedicated to multiple modes of transportation. POLICY 14.7 Encourage the use of transit and other alternatives modes of travel to the private automobile through the positioning of building entrances and the convenient location of support facilities that prioritizes access from these modes. OBJECTIVE 15: ENCOURAGE ALTERNATIVES TO THE AUTOMOBILE AND REDUCED TRAFFIC LEVELS ON RESIDENTIAL STREETS THAT SUFFER FROM EXCESSIVE TRAFFIC THROUGH THE MANAGEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND FACILITIES. POLICY 15.2 Consider partial closure of certain residential streets to automobile traffic where the nature and level of automobile traffic impairs livability and safety, provided that there is an abundance of alternative routes such that the closure will not create undue congestion on parallel streets. POLICY 20.2 Reduce, relocate or prohibit automobile facility features on transit preferential streets, such as driveways and loading docks, to avoid traffic conflicts and automobile congestion. OBJECTIVE 23: IMPROVE THE CITY'S PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION SYSTEM TO PROVIDE FOR EFFICIENT, PLEASANT, AND SAFE MOVEMENT. OBJECTIVE 24: IMPROVE THE AMBIENCE OF THE PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENT. POLICY 24.4 Preserve pedestrian-oriented building frontages. OBJECTIVE 26: CONSIDER THE SIDEWALK AREA AS AN IMPORTANT ELEMENT IN THE CITYWIDE OPEN SPACE SYSTEM. POLICY 26.1 Retain streets and alleys not required for traffic, or portions thereof, for through pedestrian circulation and open space use. POLICY 26.3 Encourage pedestrian serving uses on the sidewalk. Page 17 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans OBJECTIVE 30: ENSURE THAT THE PROVISION OF NEW OR ENLARGED PARKING FACILITIES DOES NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT THE LIVABILITY AND DESIRABILITY OF THE CITY AND ITS VARIOUS NEIGHBORHOODS. COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY ELEMENT The Area Plans propose development densities, design guidelines, and pedestrian improvements that encourage and increase active ground floor-retail and neighborhood commercial uses within walking distance of residences and other major uses. The Area Plans also support and encourage existing and new retail commerce by encouraging ground floor retail in commercial areas. The proposed amendments will support the creation of new housing units in mixed-used areas, providing a market for increased retail uses along these corridors and allowing expansion of the customer base for neighborhood serving businesses. The Area Plans also would encourage maintaining a diverse economic base by protecting industrial businesses and activities through the limitation of competing uses and the creation of clearer land use controls in areas designated as production, distribution and repair (PDR). Specifically, the Plans contain provisions to limit office and housing development in industrial areas and mixed-use areas to limit displacement of the City's industrial and service sectors, while seeking to balance this by providing sufficient space to accommodate emerging new economic activities. POLICY 1.1 Encourage development which provides substantial net benefits and minimizes undesirable consequences. Discourage development which has substantial undesirable consequences that cannot be mitigated. POLICY 1.3 Locate commercial and industrial activities according to a generalized commercial and industrial land use plan. OBJECTIVE 2 MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE A SOUND AND DIVERSE ECONOMIC BASE AND FISCAL STRUCTURE FOR THE CITY. POLICY 2.1 Seek to retain existing commercial and industrial activity and to attract new such activity to the city. OBJECTIVE 3 PROVIDE EXPANDED EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR CITY RESIDENTS, PARTICULARLY THE UNEMPLOYED AND ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED. POLICY 3.1 Promote the attraction, retention and expansion of commercial and industrial firms which provide employment improvement opportunities for unskilled and semiskilled workers. Page 18 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans POLICY 3.3 Emphasize job training and retraining programs that will impart skills necessary for participation in the San Francisco labor market. POLICY 3.4 Assist newly emerging economic activities. OBJECTIVE 4 IMPROVE THE VIABILITY OF EXISTING INDUSTRY IN THE CITY AND THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF THE CITY AS A LOCATION FOR NEW INDUSTRY. POLICY 4.2 Promote and attract those economic activities with potential benefit to the City. POLICY 4.3 Carefully consider public actions that displace existing viable industrial firms. POLICY 4.4 When displacement does occur, attempt to relocate desired firms within the city. POLICY 4.5 Control encroachment of incompatible land uses on viable industrial activity. POLICY 4.11 Maintain an adequate supply of space appropriate to the needs of incubator industries. OBJECTIVE 6: MAINTAIN AND STRENGTHEN VIABLE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL AREAS EASILY ACCESSIBLE TO CITY RESIDENTS. POLICY 6.1 Ensure and encourage the retention and provision of neighborhood-serving goods and services in the city's neighborhood commercial districts, while recognizing and encouraging diversity among the districts. POLICY 6.2 Promote economically vital neighborhood commercial districts which foster small business enterprises and entrepreneurship and which are responsive to economic and technological innovation in the marketplace and society. POLICY 6.3 Preserve and promote the mixed commercial-residential character in neighborhood commercial districts. Strike a balance between the preservation of existing affordable housing and needed expansion of commercial activity. POLICY 6.6 Adopt specific zoning districts which conform to a generalized neighborhood commercial land use and density plan. POLICY 6.7 Promote high quality urban design on commercial streets. Page 19 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE ELEMENT The new Area Plans provide for new publicly accessible open space, improved open space requirements, joint open space requirements, as well as improved access to open space and recreation. The Plans recommend a new neighborhood park in each of the four areas as well as the addition of open space amenities to sidewalks, streets and alleys. POLICY 2.1 Provide an adequate total quantity and equitable distribution of public open spaces throughout the City. POLICY 2.3 Preserve sunlight in public open spaces. POLICY 2.7 Acquire additional open space for public use. POLICY 2.9 Maintain and expand the urban forest. POLICY 2.12 Expand community garden opportunities throughout the City. OBJECTIVE 4 PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR RECREATION AND THE ENJOYMENT OF OPEN SPACE IN EVERY SAN FRANCISCO NEIGHBORHOOD. POLICY 4.1 Make better use of existing facilities. POLICY 4.4 Acquire and develop new public open space in existing residential neighborhoods, giving priority to areas which are most deficient in open space. POLICY 4.5 Require private usable outdoor open space in new residential development. POLICY 4.6 Assure the provision of adequate public open space to serve new residential development. COMMUNITY FACILITIES ELEMENT The Area Plans encourage the support and maintenance of existing community facilities, and provision of new facilities in the neighborhoods to meet the needs of projected growing populations and to address the impact of new development. The Plans call for the appropriate location of facilities. They encourage that child care be located in schools or near transit; the consideration of school spaces in some neighborhoods to meet projected growth; the funding of other community improvements such as library materials, maintenance of public health facilities and new spaces for non-profits that serve the neighborhoods. The Plans also support efforts to preserve and enhance social and cultural institutions to can help create a strong sense of community and identity and contribute to creating vibrant neighborhoods. Page 20 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans OBJECTIVE 3 ASSURE THAT NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENTS HAVE ACCESS TO NEEDED SERVICES AND A FOCUS FOR NEIGHBORHOOD ACTIVITIES. POLICY 3.1 Provide neighborhood centers in areas lacking adequate community facilities. POLICY 3.4 Locate neighborhood centers so they are easily accessible and near the natural center of activity. POLICY 3.6 Base priority for the development of neighborhood centers on relative need. OBJECTIVE 4 PROVIDE NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS THAT ARE RESPONSIVE TO THE COMMUNITY SERVED. OBJECTIVE 8 ASSURE THAT PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES ARE DISTRIBUTED AND LOCATED IN A MANNER THAT WILL ENHANCE THEIR EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE USE. AIR QUALITY ELEMENT The Area Plans contain a number of policies that would lower negative impacts on air quality by encouraging the use of transit, improving the quality of open space, encouraging "green" development and proposing transit improvements. The Plans encourage new development in areas that are well served by transit, do not require residential parking and encourage more density along the transit corridors. The Area Plans' goals to enhance non-auto travel would reduce emissions from automobiles. OBJECTIVE 2: REDUCE MOBILE SOURCES OF AIR POLLUTION THROUGH IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT OF THE GENERAL PLAN. The transportation element of the general plan calls for the following: reducing congestion on roadways; giving priority to public transit, as mandated by the "Transit First" POLICY; encouraging the use of modes of travel other than single occupant vehicles such as transit, carpooling, walking, and bicycling; promoting coordination between land use and transportation to improve air quality; and OBJECTIVE 3: DECREASE THE AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF DEVELOPMENT BY COORDINATION OF LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION DECISIONS. POLICY 3.1 Take advantage of the high density development in San Francisco to improve the transit infrastructure and also encourage high density and compact development where an extensive transportation infrastructure exists. POLICY 3.2 Encourage mixed land use development near transit lines and provide retail and other types of service oriented uses within walking distance to minimize automobile dependent development. Page 21 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans POLICY 3.4 Continue past efforts and existing policies to promote new residential development in and close to the downtown area and other centers of employment, to reduce the number of auto commute trips to the city and to improve the housing/job balance within the city. POLICY 3.5 Continue existing growth management policies in the city and give consideration to the overall air quality impacts of new development including its impact on the local and regional transportation system in the permit review process. Ensure that growth will not outpace improvements to transit or the circulation system. POLICY 3.6 Link land use decision making policies to the availability of transit and consider the impacts of these policies on the local and regional transportation system. POLICY 3.9 Encourage and require planting of trees in conjunction with new development to enhance pedestrian environment and select species of trees that optimize achievement of air quality goals. ARTS ELEMENT The Plans require high design standards and the implementation of architectural guidelines. The Plans also encourage support of existing cultural venues and creating space for new cultural and social institutions as well as creating a system to demarcate important cultural and social resources in the neighborhoods. POLICY I.3.3 Strive for the highest standards of design of public buildings and grounds and structures placed in the public right of way. POLICY II.2.3 Continue to increase City support for organizations and developing institutions which reflect the diverse cultural traditions of the San Francisco population. Prior to considering relevant amendments to the General Plan, Planning Code and Zoning Map on August 7th 2008, the Planning Commission adopted Motion No.17659. In that action, the Commission certified the Eastern Neighborhoods Environmental Impact Report. The Planning Commission also adopted Motion No.17661, adopting California Environmental Quality Act Findings related to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans project. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Commission adopts and incorporates by reference the CEQA findings in Commission Resolution No.17661; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that pursuant to Planning Code Section 340(d), the Planning Commission finds from the facts presented that the public necessity, convenience and general welfare require the proposed amendments to the General Plan; Page 22 of 23 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Resolution Approving General Plan Amendments Consisting of Text and Map Amendments Pursuant to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Commission adopts, as amendments to the General Plan, the four proposed Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans as attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Planning Commission specifically authorizes the following additional changes to the General Plan Amendments legislation and directs staff to work with the City Attorney's Office to prepare a new version of the General Plan Amendment legislation to reflect these changes and submit the new version to the Board of Supervisors for its consideration: 1) add technical changes to address typographical errors, insert Area Plan language adopted prior to approval, and similar technical changes; and 2) incorporate any additional changes to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans or the General Plan that the Planning Commission specifically identifies as part of its approval action on August 7, 2008; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Planning Commission adopts a Resolution approving amendments to the General Plan of the City and County of San Francisco, in order to implement the proposed four Eastern Neighborhoods Plans Mission, Central Waterfront, East South of Market and Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plans, as contained in a draft ordinance approved as to form by the City attorney and contained in Exhibit II-3A, as though fully set forth herein; I hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution was ADOPTED by the Planning Commission on August, 7, 2008. Linda Avery Commission Secretary AYES: NOES: EXCUSED: ADOPTED: Borden, Lee, Moore, Olague, Sugaya None Antonini, Miguel August 7, 2008 Page 23 of 23 FILE NO. ORDINANCE NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 [Approving General Plan Amendments Related to the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans the Mission, East SoMa, Showplace Square/Potrero Hill and Central Waterfront Area Plans.] Ordinance amending the San Francisco General Plan by adding four new area plans, entitled the Mission Area Plan, the East South of Market (East SoMa) Area Plan, the Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plan and the Central Waterfront Area Plan and approving General Plan amendments to implement the four aforementioned Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans by amending the Commerce and Industry and Recreation and Open Space Elements, the Land Use Index, and the South of Market, Northeastern Waterfront, and Central Waterfront Area Plans; making environmental findings and findings that the proposed amendments are consistent with the General Plan and the eight priority policies of the Planning Code Section 101.1. Note: Additions are single-underline italics Times New Roman; deletions are strikethrough italics Times New Roman. Board amendment additions are double underlined. Board amendment deletions are strikethrough normal. Be it ordained by the People of the City and County of San Francisco: Section 1. Findings. A. Section 4.105 of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco provides that the Planning Commission shall periodically recommend to the Board of Supervisors, for approval or rejection, proposed amendments to the General Plan. B. On __________, the Board of Supervisors received from the Planning Department the proposed General Plan amendments including the addition of four new Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans: the Mission Area Plan, the East SoMa Area Plan, the Showplace Square/Potrero Hill and the Central Waterfront Plan, and related General Plan amendments to the Commerce and Industry and Recreation and Open Space Elements, the Planning Department BOARD OF SUPERVISORS page 1 8/21/2008 FILE NO. ORDINANCE NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Land Use Index , and the South of Market, Northeastern Waterfront, and Central Waterfront Area Plans, collectively, the "Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plan Amendments". These Amendments are on file with the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors in File No._____ and are incorporated herein by reference. C. Section 4.105 of the City Charter further provides that if the Board of Supervisors fails to Act within 90 days of receipt of the proposed Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments, then the proposed amendments shall be deemed approved. D. San Francisco Planning Code Section 340 provides that the Planning Commission may initiate an amendment to the General Plan by a resolution of intention, which refers to, and incorporates by reference, the proposed General Plan amendments. Section 340 further provides that Planning Commission shall adopt the proposed General Plan amendments after a public hearing if it finds from the facts presented that the public necessity, convenience and general welfare require the proposed amendment or any part thereof. If adopted by the Commission in whole or in part, the proposed amendments shall be presented to the Board of Supervisors, which may approve or reject the amendments by a majority vote. E. On April 17, 2008, in Motion No. 17585 the Planning Commission initiated amendments to the General Plan, the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments, after a duly noticed public hearing. Said motion is on file with the clerk of the Board of Supervisors and incorporated herein by reference. F. On August 7, 2008, at a duly noticed public meeting, the Planning Commission certified the Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the proposed Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans (the "Project") by Motion No. __________ finding the Final EIR reflected the independent judgment and analysis of the City and County of San Francisco, is adequate, accurate and objective, contains no significant revisions to the Draft EIR, and the SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Page 2 8/21/2008 Exhibit IV-3A FILE NO. ORDINANCE NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 content of the report and the procedures through which the Final EIR was prepared, publicized and reviewed comply with the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA") (California Public Resources Code Section 21000 et seq.), the CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs. Section 15000 et seq.) and Chapter 31 of the San Francisco Administrative Code. Copies of the Planning Commission Motion and Final EIR are on file with the Clerk of the Board in File No. _________________________ and are incorporated herein by reference. G. The Project evaluated in the Final EIR includes amendments to the General Plan, Planning Code and Zoning Map related to the Project that the Planning Department has proposed. The Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments is an action proposed by the Planning Department that is within the scope of the Project evaluated in the Final EIR. H. At the same hearing during which the Planning Commission certified the Final EIR, the Planning Commission adopted CEQA Findings with respect to the approval of the proposed Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments in Motion __________ and adopted the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments in Resolution __________, finding in accordance with Planning Code Section 302 that the public necessity, convenience and general welfare required the proposed amendments. The letter from the Planning Department transmitting the proposed Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments to the Board of Supervisors, the Final EIR and supplemental material described above, the CEQA Findings adopted by the Planning Commission with respect to the approval of the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments, including a mitigation monitoring and reporting program and a statement of overriding considerations, the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments and the Resolution approving the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments are on file with the Clerk of the Board in File No._____________________________. These and any and all other documents referenced SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Page 3 8/21/2008 Exhibit IV-3A FILE NO. ORDINANCE NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 in this Ordinance have been made available to the Board of Supervisors and may be found in either the files of the Planning Department, as the custodian of records, at 1650 Mission Street in San Francisco, or in File No. ___________________________ with the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors at 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, San Francisco and are incorporated herein by reference. I. The Board of Supervisors has reviewed and considered the Final EIR and the environmental documents on file referred to herein. The Board of Supervisors has reviewed and considered the CEQA Findings adopted by the Planning Commission in support of the approval of the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments, including the mitigation monitoring and reporting program and the statement of overriding considerations, and hereby adopts as its own and incorporates the CEQA Findings contained in Planning Commission Motion No. ________ by reference as though such findings were fully set forth in this Ordinance. J. The Board of Supervisors endorses the implementation of the mitigation measures identified in the Planning Commission's CEQA Findings including those for implementation by other City Departments and recommends for adoption those mitigation measures that are enforceable by agencies other than City agencies, all as set forth in the CEQA Findings, including the mitigation monitoring and reporting program contained in the referenced CEQA Findings. K. The Board of Supervisors finds that no substantial changes have occurred in the Project proposed for approval under this Ordinance that will require revisions in the Final EIR due to the involvement of new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects, no substantial changes have occurred with respect to the circumstances under which the Project proposed for approval under the Ordinance are undertaken which will require major revisions to the Final EIR due to the SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Page 4 8/21/2008 Exhibit IV-3A FILE NO. ORDINANCE NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 involvement of new environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of effects identified in the Final EIR and no new information of substantial importance to the Project as proposed for approval in the Ordinance has become available which indicates that (1) the Project will have significant effects not discussed in the Final EIR, (2) significant environmental effects will be substantially more severe, (3) mitigation measure or alternatives found not feasible which would reduce one or more significant effects have become feasible or (4) mitigation measures or alternatives which are considerably different from those in the Final EIR would substantially reduce one or more significant effects on the environment. M. The Board of Supervisors finds, pursuant to Planning Code Section 340, that the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments set forth in the documents on file with the Clerk of the Board in File No. _____________________ will serve the public necessity, convenience and general welfare for the reasons set forth in Planning Commission Resolution No. __________ and incorporates those reasons herein by reference. N. The Board of Supervisors finds that the Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments are, on balance, in conformity with the General Plan, as it is amended by this Ordinance, and the eight priority policies of Planning Code Section 101.1 for the reasons set forth in Planning Commission Resolution No. __________. The Board hereby adopts the findings set forth in Planning Commission Resolution No. __________. Section 2. The Board of Supervisors hereby approves the proposed Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans Amendments, an amendment to the General Plan, as recommended to the Board of Supervisors by the Planning Commission in Resolution No. __________, and directs the Planning Department to update the General Plan's Land Use Index to reflect these Amendments. SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Page 5 8/21/2008 Exhibit IV-3A FILE NO. ORDINANCE NO. . 1 APPROVED AS TO FORM: DENNIS J. HERRERA, City Attorney By: . () SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Page 6 8121/2008 Exhibit IV-3A Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan NOTE: New text is underlined and italicized Deleted text has a strikethrough The Commerce and Industry Element of the San Francisco General Plan is hereby amended to read as follows: COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY ELEMENT INTRODUCTION The Commerce and Industry Element sets forth objectives and polices that address the broad range of economic activities, facilities and support systems that constitute San Francisco's employment and service base. The plan serves as a comprehensive guide for both the public and private sectors when making decisions related to economic growth and change. The plan is framed within three overriding goals which call for continued economic vitality, social equity and environmental quality. These broad goals are interrelated, and economic development decisions must be examined within their context. The challenge posed is to guide and encourage economic development in a manner that is responsive to near term needs, while also being consistent with long range goals and values. The plan focuses on eight objectives, three of which address the general issue of economic planning. The remaining five objectives deal with specific sectors of San Francisco's economy. Objectives and policies for downtown office and retail are contained in the Downtown Plan. In summary, the three general objectives call for managing economic growth and change to ensure enhancement of the total city environment, maintaining a sound and diverse economic base and fiscal structure, and providing expanded employment opportunities for city residents, particularly those that are unemployed. The specific objectives are responsive to the several major economic sectors within San Francisco which include manufacturing and industry, maritime activities, office/administrative services, neighborhood commercial retailing, specialized regional retail trade, government services, and visitor trade. Due to the changing nature of the activities that occur in the City's industrial areas, the term "Production, Distribution and Repair" (PDR) is used to refer to the wide variety of activities that have traditionally occurred and still occur in these areas. This term refers not just to traditional "smokestack industry," but also to a wide range of activities that need larger spaces, cheaper land or may produce noise or odors. The objectives and supportive policies are general in nature and provide the framework for decision making, priority setting and evaluation of costs and benefits as they relate to alternative proposals for economic development and change. Exhibit II-4A Page 1 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan Likewise, the Commerce and Industry Element sets the framework for the more detailed planning that is required to meet the needs of specific economic activities, and to reconcile conflicts and competition among the various economic sectors, and other land uses and activities. The Commerce and Industry Element, along with the other General Plan Elements, is used in forming shorter range plans, special area plans and to guide public actions by various government agencies. The objectives and policies are referred to when reviewing zoning and land use changes, legislative referrals, development proposals, and the City's programs for economic development, change and adjustment, serving as a basis for guiding public and private decisions. POLICY 1.3 Locate commercial and industrial activities according to a generalized commercial and industrial land use plan. The following principles are integral and basic elements of citywide land use planning policy for commerce and industry. 1. The natural division of the city into two distinct functional areas-one primarily for production, distribution and services, and the other for residential purposes and the community facilities which are closely related to residential activities, should be recognized and encouraged. 1. The desirable division of the City into: 1) Some areas where several mutually compatible uses intermingle (mixed-use areas). These areas should generally occur in the City's central core and along many of the City's transit corridors. 2) Other areas that serve as distinct functional areas, including some for production, distribution and repair and others for residential uses and the community facilities that are closely related to residential activities. 2. A working population holding capacity should be established for the city based on desirable and feasible density standards. 3. Where feasible and desirable the working areas of the city should be defined and designated in extent so as to increase the efficiency of each of the areas as a specialized center of management, production, service or distribution. 4. The working areas of the city should be related to the trafficways and transit systems so as to minimize time and distance in the journey to work from each of the community areas of the city and from within the San Francisco Bay Region. Except in a few isolated instances the entire range of commercial and industrial activities of citywide importance is and should continue to be confined to the eastern flank of the city between the Bay and the first tier of hills rising west of the Bay. The types of use for which land should be allocated in the working Exhibit II-4A Page 2 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan areas are classified into four categories: 1) Downtown, 2) Business and Services, 3) Light Industry, and 4) General Industry. The Downtown District contains the downtown shopping, entertainment and financial sections of the city as well as some of the downtown hotel quarters. Adjacent to this district is the primary area devoted to and designated for Business Services. These are businesses and uses which supplement and are necessary to the total economy of the downtown area. The other designated uses are those light and general industries which occupy part of the harbor and occupy the flat land along the Bay shore of the city, primarily south of China Basin. The Plan indicates a transitional belt of light industry, between the general industrial section and residential sections in adjacent community areas. Adjacent to and to the south of this District are areas that have been traditionally devoted to business service and light industrial activities. As the City's economy changes, some of this area, particularly the portions closer to the Downtown District, should transition to denser uses, including residential and office, while others will continue to be needed for business services, light industrial and other uses that require larger spaces and cheaper land. POLICY 1.4 Establish commercial and industrial density limits, where appropriate, as indicated in the Generalized Commercial and Industrial Density Plan map. OBJECTIVE 2 MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE A SOUND AND DIVERSE ECONOMIC BASE AND FISCAL STRUCTURE FOR THE CITY. The continued health of the commercial and industrial sectors of the city is important to residents beyond the aspect of employment. A strong and viable business sector generates development of a broader property tax base. San Francisco must annually budget and expend money for the maintenance and upgrading of its public improvements -- roads, sewers, transit system, parks, and other facilities. As these costs escalate along with other social service delivery costs -- schools, hospitals, social welfare, police, fire -- it is critically important to diversity and strengthen the tax base that pays for many of these improvements and services. When it becomes necessary to raise property taxes to pay these costs, the impact falls heavily on residents and business, contributing to the outmigration of population and industry. Strengthening and broadening the tax base is therefore vital to the continued economic health of the city. There also is a need to diversify the economic base of the city. Because of regional and national economic forces over which there is little local control, the city's economy is becoming more specialized in the areas of finance, insurance and real estate, tourism, and government and personal services. Some of these sectors are subject to cyclical variations that may contribute to instability of the economy. Furthermore, excessive dependence on these sectors also has implications for personal lifestyles, as more and more residents are dependent on office "paper jobs" for their livelihoods. Therefore, to the extent it is possible to alter the trend of greater single industry specialization and provide more diversity in the types of activities and job opportunities, the City should seek to do so. Exhibit II-4A Page 3 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan While traditional manufacturing no longer has a significant presence in the City, there are a wide variety of activities under the rubric of "Production, Distribution and Repair," which are flourishing in the City. Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR) refers to the very wide variety of activities which have traditionally occurred and still occur in our industrially-zoned areas. Among many other things, PDR businesses and workers prepare food and print books; produce the sounds and images for films; provide transportation services, arrange flowers and set theatrical stages; build houses and offices; pick up mail and garbage. PDR includes arts activities, performance spaces, furniture wholesaling, and design activities. In general, PDR activities, occurring largely in the southeast part of the city, provide critical support to the drivers of San Francisco's economy, including the tourist industry, high tech industry and financial and legal services, to name a few. PDR businesses also tend to provide stable and well-paying jobs for the 50 percent of San Francisco residents who do not have a college degree. It is therefore important for the health and diversity of the City's economy and population that the City preserves space for PDR activities. PDR jobs constitute a significant portion of jobs in the neighborhoods where they are located. The jobs tend to pay above average wages, provide jobs for residents of all education levels, and offer good opportunities for advancement. PDR businesses also contribute to a valuable export industry. PDR businesses that design or manufacture products in San Francisco often do so because of unique advantages of being located in the city. These export industries strengthen and diversify our local economy. PDR businesses also help local industries to stay competitive by providing critical services that need to be close, timely and often times are highly specialized. POLICY 2.1 Seek to retain existing commercial and industrial activity and to attract new such activity to the city. Many of the decisions made by a business concerning its future location are determined principally by factors related to market conditions affecting the cost of doing business. Factors, such as the purchase, transportation and storage of raw materials, labor costs changes in the nature or location of the consumers of the service or product, and obsolescence of capital equipment, are critical in determining whether a firm will move or not. There is little a city can do to alter these economic conditions in order to attract or retain a business. However, there are some factors that a city can affect in order to improve the possibility that a firm will decide to locate or remain in the city. The first step is to assess the needs of the business for such things as better transportation access, parking, room for expansion, security and a pleasant neighborhood environment for employees to work in. In promoting the city as an area for potential firm location, it is important to be aware of those special aspects of location, environment, population and economic and social history that differentiate the city from other locations and make it a favored place for particular types of firms. In most instances these factors will be well known to a firm, and the City's receptiveness and "business climate" may be decisive in a determination to locate in San Francisco or a neighboring jurisdiction. The City should improve its Exhibit II-4A Page 4 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan chances for attracting firms by directing efforts toward business activities needing central city locations for office support, those benefiting from close proximity to a large, concentrated consumer population, and sectors for which San Francisco is already well known such as the design and apparel industries. OBJECTIVE 4 IMPROVE THE VIABILITY OF EXISTING INDUSTRY IN THE CITY AND THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF THE CITY AS A LOCATION FOR NEW INDUSTRY. The dispersion of manufacturing activities from their initial concentration in San Francisco during the mid 19th Century has been a gradual process. Since the beginning of the century, aside from the stimulation provided by two major world wars, manufacturing has steadily declined in importance as an employer and land user in San Francisco just as it has gained in other parts of the Bay Region. San Francisco is not alone in experiencing a decline in the manufacturing and wholesaling sectors of industrial activity. Central cities, almost without exception, have experienced this trend largely for the same objective reasons that it has occurred in San Francisco - population shifts toward suburban areas, technological developments which demanded land-intensive structures, rising wages, escalating local taxes and costs of doing business in central cities. San Francisco has never been heavily dependent on manufacturing as an employer and tax base provider. This fact has lessened the impacts of fiscal and employment declines. The employment decline experienced by the manufacturing sector was inevitable to the extent that the factors causing the outmigration were beyond the control of the city. However, the amount of continued decline can be, to some extent, influenced by the city. It is not likely that, given limits on available financial resources for massive redevelopment, the city can significantly overcome the objective factors which have lead to the loss of employment. However, cost-effective policies designed to reduce the loss of employment opportunities can and should be pursued which would be directed towards improving the climate for business in the city and providing adequate areas and services to encourage firms to remain in the city. Furthermore, despite the decline of manufacturing generally, there are activities mentioned below that fall under the general category of PDR, for which the central city remains an attractive location. Growth in these areas should be encouraged and space for them should be designated. POLICY 4.2 Promote and attract those economic activities with potential benefit to the City. Along with efforts to retain businesses, the City must attempt to attract new businesses to the city. It is likely that the City would have to undertake very costly measures such as major redevelopment combined with tax exemptions and subsidies in order to attract businesses for which a San Francisco location does not offer a comparative advantage. However, there are a number of economic activities for which the City does have a comparative advantage. Examples include the manufacturing of apparel and other textile products, small scale furniture manufacturers, commercial printing, communications companies, and business, medical and educational services. By concentrating attraction efforts on such enterprises the expenditure of the City's limited resources can be much more cost effective. Exhibit II-4A Page 5 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan POLICY 4.5 Avoid encroachment of incompatible land uses on viable industrial or PDR activity. There are a small number of locations in the city which are a mixture of residential, commercial and industrial uses which were developed prior to modern zoning controls with separate uses. The South of Market area is a prime example. Such areas are resources of needed low cost housing and should be preserved and improved where feasible. Care should be taken, however, to permit residential expansion in a way that will not cause eventual large scale displacement of the existing viable businesses whenever feasible. Another potential problem results from the proximity of the growing office core to smaller scale business and industries in the South of Market area. Growth of the downtown office core should be carefully guided to avoid unnecessary dislocation. Much of the Southeastern part of the City has developed as a mixture of residential, commercial and industrial uses, and in fact historically zoning in this area has generally allowed all of these to co-exist. In the 1990s, non-industrial uses particularly housing and offices that can pay far more for land began to make significant inroads on industrially zoned land in the southeastern part of the City. The City should reconsider the generally permissive zoning controls in these areas in favor of more specifically delineating areas where PDR uses should be protected from other types of land uses and areas where housing and/or offices should be allowed to predominate. POLICY 4.11 Maintain an adequate supply of space appropriate to the needs of incubator industries. Small, emerging industries in the City, many utilizing new technologies, are dependent on relatively inexpensive space accessible to prospective markets. Examples of these "incubator" type industries include electronic data processing firms, business services, apparel manufacturing and design, crafts manufacturing, etc. During the early stages of developments, while markets are being established, fixed costs such as rent and transportation must be kept at minimal levels. Larger, older buildings with storage and loft space are particularly valuable. The South of Market area is Portions of the southeast sector of the City are currently serving as a functional areas containing a supply of such spaces needed by new "incubator" businesses. The maintenance of a reservoir of such spaces, which can fulfill these needs, is needed. The Open Space of the San Francisco General Plan is hereby amended to read as follows: OPEN SPACE OBJECTIVE 4 PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR RECREATION AND THE ENJOYMENT OF OPEN SPACE IN EVERY SAN FRANCISCO NEIGHBORHOOD. Exhibit II-4A Page 6 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan Every neighborhood should be served by adequate public open space and recreation facilities. Neighborhood parks and recreation facilities are essential; many people are unable to use citywide facilities if they are not located nearby. This is especially important for the very young and for the elderly whose mobility is limited. High land costs and a shortage of vacant sites restrict opportunities to provide new open space in many neighborhoods. For this reason, it is important that the city maximize use of existing facilities. Making the best use of parks and recreation areas can help offset the limited opportunities to create new ones and can bring the most immediate improvement in services to San Francisco neighborhoods. This section has general policies for neighborhood open space and recreation. More detailed plans for neighborhood open space are included in Special Area Plans which have, or will be adopted as part of the General Plan. The general policies in this Element are applied in the preparation of the Special Area Plans, and more specific recreation and open space proposals are developed. The more specific proposals may be found in the following plans: Western Shoreline, Central Waterfront, Northeastern Waterfront, Chinatown, The Downtown, Rincon Hill, Market Octavia, East SoMa, Mission, Showplace Square/Potrero Hill and Bayview Hunters Point. South Bayshore. SOUTH OF MARKET The South of Market Area Plan of the San Francisco General Plan is hereby amended as follows: The South of Market Area Plan will be replaced in its entirety by a two new plans with new boundaries the East SoMa Area Plan and, when completed, the Western SoMa Area Plan. Please see the East SoMa Area Plan in attachment II-4A for the boundaries of the Plan. Until the West SoMa Area Plan is completed the South of Market Area Plan will only apply to areas outside East SoMa, the Maps in South of Market Area Plan will be amended accordingly to show the borders. In addition, the following amendments apply to the South of Market Area Plan. Amend the existing table on page II.10.22 of the General Plan to reflect updated lists of significant and contributory buildings that are currently located outside as well as within the designated South End Historic District to say (see table and map below): I. LIST OF SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS LOCATED OUTSIDE OF THE PROPOSED DESIGNATED SOUTH END HISTORIC DISTRICT. II. LIST OF CONTRIBUTORY BUILDINGS LOCATED WITHIN THE PROPOSED DESIGNATED SOUTH END HISTORIC DISTRICT. Add map below to illustrate this updated list of significant and contributory buildings that are currently located outside as well as within the designated South End Historic District. Exhibit II-4A Page 7 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan Significant and Contributory Buildings in the South End Historic District I. LIST OF SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS LOCATED OUTSIDE OF THE DESIGNATED SOUTH END HISTORIC DISTRICT. Assessor's Block/Lot 3787/31 3776/41 3777/48 3520/30C 3517/13 3520/30B 3520/54-59 3757/67 3520/51 3755/27 3731/94 3731/74 3731/128-149 3727/14 3728/14 3517/35 3517/34 3728/89 3786/263-307 3786/15 3785/2A 3777/1 E or W SOMA? E E W W W W W W W W E E E W W W W W W W W E Address 475 Brannan St. 539 Bryant St. 673 Bryant St. 1477-1479 Emberly Alley (City Landmark No. 199) 1400 Folsom St. 1477 Folsom St. (City Landmark No. 199) 1489 Folsom St. (City Landmark No. 199) 1275 Harrison St. 1440 Harrison St. 7 Heron St. 1035 Howard St. 1049 Howard St. 1097 Howard St. 1126 Howard St. 1234 Howard St. 1401 Howard St. (City Landmark No.120) 1415 Howard St. 1235 Mission St. 310 Townsend St. 350 Townsend St. 410 Townsend St. 500 Fourth St. Exhibit II-4A Page 8 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan 3787/ 52139 3726/11 3726/2 3732/124 3785/7 3754/18 3729/82 3509/14 3525/93-111 3520/29 3520/28A E E E E E E W W W W W 601 Fourth St. 182 Sixth St. 106 Sixth St. 201 Sixth St. 665 Sixth St. 335 Seventh St. 201 Ninth St. 165 Tenth St. (City Landmark No. 246) 465 Tenth St. 319 Eleventh St. (City Landmark No. 199) 333 Eleventh St. (City Landmark No. 199) Exhibit II-4A Page 9 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan II. LIST OF CONTRIBUTORY BUILDINGS LOCATED WITHIN THE DESIGNATED SOUTH END HISTORIC DISTRICT. Assessor's Block/Lot 3774/73 3789/9 3775/8 3788/37 3774/8 3774/75-118 3774/67 3789/10 3794/23 3794/15 3794/14 3794/10 3794/22 3788/9 3794/21 3788/9A 3788/10 3788/12 3764/71-197 3775/1 3775/2 3775/4 3774/123-132 3774/44 3775/5 3774/191 In or out of SE HD? In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In In Address 274 Brannan St. 275 Brannan St. 300 Brannan St. 301 Brannan St. 333 Bryant St. 355 Bryant St. 385 Bryant St. 52 Colin P. Kelly St. 128 King St. (City Landmark No. 229) 101 Townsend St. 111 Townsend St. 115 Townsend St. 135 Townsend St. 136 Townsend St. 139 Townsend St. 144 Townsend St. 148 Townsend St. 166 Townsend St. 461 Second St. 500 Second St. 512 Second St. 522 Second St. 533 Second St. 536 Second St. 544 Second St. 545 Second St. Exhibit II-4A Page 10 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan 3774/45 3774/31 3789/8 3789/7 3788/38 3788/2 3788/49-73 3788/43,44 3788/6 3789/858-971 3788/45 3787/8 3788/41 3788/15 In In In In In In In In In In In In In In 555 Second St. 599 Second St. 601 Second St. 625 Second St. 634 Second St. 640 Second St. 650 Second St. 670 Second St. 698 Second St. 699 Second St. 625 Third St. 660 Third St. 665 Third St. 685 Third St. Exhibit II-4A Page 11 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan The Central Waterfront Area Plan of the San Francisco General Plan is hereby amended as follows: CENTRAL WATERFRONT The Central Waterfront Area Plan adopted on September 27, 1990 by Planning Commission Resolution 12040 is replaced in its entirety by a new Central Waterfront Area Plan with new boundaries. The Northeastern Waterfront Area Plan of the San Francisco General Plan is hereby amended to read as follows: NORTHEASTERN WATEFRONT Introduction Section, Page II.9.6 of the General Plan: ....To achieve these goals, the Plan recommends general objectives and policies for Land Use, Transportation, and Urban Design and recommends specific objectives and policies which apply to four geographic subareas as well as the Embarcadero Corridor which links them: Fisherman's Wharf Subarea (which extends from the Municipal Pier at Van Ness Avenue through Pier 39); the Base of Telegraph Hill Subarea (Pier 35 through Pier 7); the Ferry Building Subarea (Pier 5 through Rincon Park); and the South Beach Piers/Sea Wall Lots Subarea (Pier 22 through Pier 46B). Note: The geographic area covered in the 1998 Northeastern Waterfront Plan includes the South Beach Sub-area (Pier 22 through Pier 46B) as shown on Map 1. Portions of this area were subsequently designated as part of a separate Redevelopment Project Area, Rincon Point -South Beach Redevelopment Area, and are governed by the Rincon Point/South Beach Redevelopment Plan. Please refer to the Rincon Point/South Beach Redevelopment Plan, their accompanying Design for Development documents and related approval documents for sub-area-specific planning objectives, land use standards and design guidelines which govern all parcels. However, the permit authority over this area will be returned to the Planning Department sometime in the future. In addition, the inland sections of the South Beach sub-area that are part of the 1998 Northeastern Waterfront Plan are now incorporated into the East South of Market Area Plan, with the exception for the Piers that are on the eastern side of Embarcadero Way (shaded parcels in the Map). Please refer to that Area Plan for the new planning objectives, land use standards and other policies that will govern those parcels. Subarea Section, Page II.9.41 of the General Plan: SOUTH BEACH PIERS/SEA WALL LOTS SUBAREA (Piers 22 through 46 B) Exhibit II-4A Page 12 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan The South Beach Piers/Sea Wall Lots Subarea extends from the Pier 22 Fireboat House, adjacent to the planned Rincon Park, to China Basin Channel and inland for a depth of one or two blocks. Since the 1980's, this subarea has been transforming into a new residential and commercial mixed use neighborhood, which still retains some of its industrial and maritime past. Because the piers originally built for breakbulk shipping are now obsolete, they are mostly vacant or underutilized, and no longer serve a primary maritime function. As a result, two are in an advanced state of deterioration and have been condemned. The single pierside improvement is South Beach Harbor, a full-service marina and small boat harbor completed in 1986 adjacent to Pier 40, which entailed the removal of former Piers 4246A. The South Beach Harbor, together with the transportation improvements installed along The Embarcadero, provide key waterfront amenities for residents in the new inland Rincon Hill and South Beach neighborhoods. Inland of the harbor, the first phase (four acres) of South Beach Park has been developed. In March 1996, the San Francisco voters approved the development of a ballpark with a maximum seating capacity of 45,000 seats and related commercial uses for Pier 46B. This new facility will attracts many visitors to the area and stimulates restaurants and night entertainment in the surrounding area. The redevelopment of Pier 46B will allow the continuation of the PortWalk alongside China Basin and the connection with the Lefty O'Doul Bridge and trails south of China Basin. Plan policies encourage redevelopment on other piers to provide opportunities for improved excursion boat, ferry and historic ship berthing and other maritime facilities, maritime support operations, commercial recreation and assembly and entertainment activities. Public access improvements also are proposed which will make the waterfront inviting and safe for nearby residents as well as visitors from downtown and beyond. The remaining inland sites which are vacant or underutilized may be developed with residential or commercial uses which complement the redeveloped areas in South Beach and Rincon Hill and new pierside activities, as well as accommodate accessory parking associated with new uses in the vicinity. The inland sites, which previously were part of the South Beach Subarea, are now incorporated into the East SoMa Area Plan. On non-Port owned inland areas, a mixed-income residential community with open spaces and commercial support services is being developed on vacant or underutilized property. The new community is interspersed with a few historic warehouses which have been adaptively reused. The historic Oriental Warehouse has been rehabilitated to accommodate live/work studios. Walkways and bicycle paths combined with small plazas would connect the new residences to waterfront activities and other portions of the City. The new community is characterized by high density, low to mid-rise structures, recreating the fine-grained fabric of San Francisco neighborhoods and takes advantage of proximity to the Downtown, a desirable microclimate, amenity value of the Bay, and helps meet San Francisco's need for new housing. OBJECTIVE 27 TO ENHANCE THE ECONOMIC VITALITY OF THE AREA AND CAPITALIZE ON ITS UNIQUE LOCATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL ATTRIBUTES FOR COMMERCIAL AND RECREATIONAL MARITIME ACTIVITIES, MARITIME SUPPORT USES, COMMERCIAL Exhibit II-4A Page 13 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan AND RECREATIONAL USES, AND RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AND NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES. Block 3770/3771 POLICY 30.9 Develop uses which support and enhance the mix of maritime and commercial recreation uses developed on Pier 30-32, as well as provide a transition between residential uses on inland blocks and public-oriented activities on the waterfront. Block 3771 would be a desirable location for a mixed commercial and residential development or a hotel, depending on the combination of uses developed on Pier 30-32. Incorporate off-street parking into the development program for Block 3771 to serve a significant amount of the parking demand associated with the Pier 30-32 development, if necessary. Residential Neighborhood POLICY 30.17 Develop and maintain mixed-income housing, with appropriate open space and neighborhood support uses on Blocks 3773, 3792, 3793 and portions of Blocks 3774 and 3789. POLICY 30.18 Develop housing in small clusters of 100 to 200 units. Provide a range of building heights with no more than 40 feet in height along the Embarcadero and stepping up in height on the more inland portions to the maximum of 160 feet. In buildings fronting on Brannan Street in the 160 foot height area, create a strong base which maintains the street wall created by the residential complex to the east and the warehouse buildings to the west. Orient the mix of unit types to one and two bedrooms and include some three and four bedroom units. Pursue as the income and tenure goals, a mix of 20 percent low, 30 percent moderate and 50 percent middle and upper income, and a mix of rental, cooperative, and condominium units. POLICY 30.19 Organize the housing clusters to maximize views to the water and downtown as well as sun exposure while minimizing shading of open space and blocking of views from adjacent areas. To the extent feasible, locate family units on ground floor levels adjacent to open space and recreational areas. Provide personalized entryways and private open space to all units. Orient the buildings to provide privacy and security. POLICY 30.20 Design the structures and dwelling units to express character and diversity. Incorporate high standards of indoor and outdoor private space design and convenience and use high quality materials. Express a human scale in surfaces and materials with articulated facades, bay windows, cornice lines, roofscapes, overhangs, towers and chimneys. Use varied light colors to break up building mass and liven surfaces. Design the housing complex to be energy efficient, and consider the use of passive solar systems. Exhibit II-4A Page 14 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan POLICY 30.21 Incorporate most parking as part of the building within housing clusters. Because garages may be only a half level below grade due to the high water table, landscape or buffer exposed garage edges. Locate residences above parking structures to stabilize them and minimize differential settlement. To the extent feasible, improve the portions of the garage roof not covered by structures for walkways and recreation areas. Use tree wells to allow large trees to grow within residential clusters. Design parking structures to have controlled vehicular access points and direct access to residential units for increased security. Provide additional guest and service parking for the residential units in street rights-of-way or adjacent to the clusters. POLICY 30.22 Do not permit buildings to exceed 65 percent coverage of land or parking podium. To the maximum extent feasible, provide open space at ground level and provide planting in the ground. Ensure that any open space on top of a podium provides easy pedestrian and visual transition from the sidewalk. POLICY 30.23 Design structures to protect views of the water down street corridors from the residential areas. Carefully consider roof design and conceal roof equipment because of its visibility from adjacent residences. Landscape flat roofs and finish sloped roofs in attractive materials. Allow exposed parking only if the parking areas are extensively landscaped. Consider the use of turf block instead of asphalt paving. Streets, Walkways and Open Space POLICY 30.26 Close the following streets completely: Berry east of Third Street, and Second south of King Street. Close the following streets to through traffic, improve them as walkways and allow only limited local and service vehicle access: Townsend between Second and the Embarcadero, Colin P. Kelly Jr. between Townsend and Brannan, First between Brannan and the Embarcadero, and Beale between Bryant and Brannan. POLICY 30.27 Develop a plaza next to the Oriental Warehouse which is centrally located, and connect it to smaller open spaces within the proposed neighborhood. Have walkways open onto small plazas to create intimacy and spatial definition and orient them to be protected from winds. Enhance the feeling of outdoor security through use of lighting, walkways design, ingress and egress points and good surveillance by building orientation. The Land Use Index of the San Francisco General Plan is hereby amended to read as follows: Note: Changes to the Land Use Index represent insertions of new land use policies introduced by the new Eastern Neighborhoods Area Plans. Since there is a new Central Waterfront Area Plan, those changes represent replacements. Exhibit II-4A Page 15 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan LAND USE INDEX HOUSING Housing Land Use Policies from Other Parts of the Master Plan Central Waterfront Area Plan Objective 2, Policy 1 Objective 6, Policies 1-3 SUBAREAS China Basin Objective 17, Policy 2 Lower Potrero Objective 26, Policies 2 and 3 Objective 1.1, Policy 2 Objective 1.2, Policies 1 Objective 1.3, Policy 2 Objective 2.1, Policy 2 East South of Market Area Plan Objective 1.1, Policies 1, 3 and 5-6 Objective 1.2, Policies 1-3 Objective 2.1, Policy 5 Objective 2.3, Policy 2 Objective 2.5, Policy 2 Objective 2.6, Policy 4 Mission Area Plan Objective 1.1, Policies 2 and 5 Objective 1.2, Policies 1-2 Objective 1.3, Policy 2 Objective 2.1, Policies 1-2 Objective 2.3, Policy 1-2 Objective 2.5, Policy 2 Showplace Square / Potrero Hill Area Plan Objective 1.1, Policy 2 Objective 1.2, Policy 1 Objective 2.2, Policy 5 Objective 2.3, Policy 2 Objective 2.5, Policy 2 Exhibit II-4A Page 16 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY Commerce and Industry Land Use Policies from Other Parts of the Master Plan Central Waterfront Area Plan Objective 1.1, Policies 1-3 and 6-9 Objective 1.3, Policies 1-2 Objective 1.8, Policy 1 Objective 1, Policies 1 and 2 Objective 2, Policy 2 Objective 3, Policies 1, 2, 8, 10 and 11 Objective 4, Policies 1-4 Objective 5, Policies 1-4 SUBAREAS Showplace Square Objective 11, Policies 1, 3 and 4 North Potrero Objective 14, Policies 1 and 2 China Basin Objective 15, Policy 1 Central Basin Objective 9, Policies 1, 2, and 3 Objective 20, Policies 1 and 2 Islais Creek Objective 22, Policies 1-3 Objective 24, Policy 1 Lower Potrero Objective 25, Policies 1 and 2 East South of Market Area Plan Objective 1.1, Policies 1, 4 and 7-9 Objective 1.2, Policy 3 Mission Area Plan Objective 1.1, Policies 1-2, 4, and 6-7 Objective 1.2, Policy 2 Objective 1.7, Policy 1 Objective 1.8, Policy 1 Objective 1.4, Policy 1 and 3 Showplace Square / Potrero Hill Area Plan Exhibit II-4A Page 17 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan Objective 1.1, Policies 1-4 Objective 1.7, Policy 1 Objective 1.4, Policies 1 and 3-4 RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE Recreation and Open Space Land Use Policies from Other Parts of the Master Plan Central Waterfront Area Plan Objective 9, Policies 1-3 China Basin Area Objective 16, Policy 1 Central Basin Area Objective 21, Policies 1 and 3 Islais Creek Area Objective 23, Policy 1 Lower Potrero Area Objective 26, Policy 5 Objective 5.1, Policy 1 Objective 5.2, Policies 1-6 Objective 5.3, Policies 1 and 6 Objective 5.5, Policy 1 East South of Market Area Plan Objective 5.1, Policy 1 Objective 5.2, Policies 1-6 Objective 5.3, Policies 1 and 6 Objective 5.5, Policy 1 Objective 7.1, Policy 6 Mission Area Plan Objective 5.1, Policy 1 Objective 5.2, Policies 1-6 Objective 5.3, Policies 1 and 6 Objective 5.5, Policy 1 Showplace Square / Potrero Hill Area Plan Objective 5.1, Policy 1 Objective 5.2, Policies 1-6 Objective 5.3, Policies 1 and 6 Objective 5.5, Policy 1 PUBLIC FACILITIES Exhibit II-4A Page 18 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan Public Facilities Land Use Policies from Other Parts of the Master Plan Central Waterfront Area Plan Objective 7.1, Policies 1-3 and 6 Objective 7.2, Policies 2 and 5 East South of Market Area Plan Objective 7.1, Policies 1-3 and 4-6 Objective 7.2, Policy 2 Objective 7.3, Policy 2 Mission Area Plan Objective 7.1, Policies 1-3 and 4 Objective 7.2, Policy 2 Objective 7.3, Policy 2 Showplace Square / Potrero Hill Area Plan Objective 7.1, Policies 1-3 and 4-5 Objective 7.2, Policies 2 and 5 POPULATION DENSITY AND BUILDING INTENSITY STANDARDS Population Density and Building Intensity Policies/Standards from Other Parts of the Master Plan Central Waterfront Area Plan Objective 1.2, Policies 2-3 Objective 1.7, Policy 3 Objective 2.3, Policy 3 Objective 3.1, Policies 1-6 and 10-11 Objective 3.2, Policy 2 East South of Market Area Plan Objective 1.2, Policies 4-5 Objective 2.3, Policy 3 Objective 3.1, Policies 1-6, 8 and 10-11 Mission Area Plan Objective 1.1, Policies 3-4 Objective 1.2, Policies 3-4 Objective 1.7, Policy 2 Objective 1.8, Policy 1 Objective 2.3, Policy 3 Exhibit II-4A Page 19 of 20 Case No. 2004.0160EMTZU Eastern Neighborhoods EXHIBIT II-4A Amendments to the General Plan Objective 3.1, Policies 1-6 and 10-11 Showplace Square / Potrero Hill Area Plan Objective 1.2, Policies 2-3 Objective 1.7, Policy 3 Objective 2.3, Policy 3 Objective 3.1, Policies 1-6 Objective 3.2, Policy 2 General Plan Map Amendments The figures that are proposed for amendment as part of the Eastern Neighborhoods planning process include the following, see revised maps after this list: Commerce and Industry Element: Map 1 - Generalized Commercial & Industrial Land Use Plan will be revised to reflect changes to where light and general industry is located based on the proposed zoning changes for the industrial land in the Eastern Neighborhoods Commerce and Industry Element: Map 2 - Generalized Commercial & Industrial Density Plan will be revised to note revised Floor Area Ratios (FAR) in the EN proposed to be zoned as Mixed Use and Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR) Districts. Commerce and Industry Element: Map 5 Generalized Neighborhood Commercial Land Use and Density Plan will be revised to show the new or revised Neighborhood Commercial Districts in the Eastern Neighborhoods. Commerce and Industry Element: Map 4 - Residential Service Areas of Neighborhood Commercial Districts and Uses will be amended to note the new Neighborhood Commercial Transit (NCT) Districts in the Eastern Neighborhoods. Central Waterfront Area Plan: Map 1 - will be updated to reflect how the boundaries of this Area Plan are being replaced by the Mission Bay North and Mission Bay South Redevelopment Plans, the new Central Waterfront Area Plan and the new Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plan. Northeastern Waterfront Plan: Map 1 - Planning Area Showing Subareas will be amended to remove the parcels from the South Beach Piers Subarea that are proposed to be incorporated into the new East SoMa Area Plan. Northeastern Waterfront Plan: Map 2 - Height and Bulk Plan in the will be amended to reflect the new boundaries of the South Beach Piers Subarea. The parcels east of Embarcadero Way are proposed to be incorporated into the new East SoMa Area Plan. Northeastern Waterfront Plan: Map 6 - South Beach Subarea Generalized Land Use Map in the will be amended to remove the parcels from the South Beach Piers Subarea that are proposed to be incorporated into the new East SoMa Area Plan. Exhibit II-4A Page 20 of 20 Commerce & Industry Element | San Francisco General Plan 101 LU M LO ST MBARD BU S See Chinatown Area Plan 1 ST BROAD WAY ST ST 80 BA See Downtown Commercial Land Use in the Downtown Area Plan DERO Y BAY ST CO F EM BA R A BR AVE ID See Rincon Hill Area Plan SS VAN NE GEARY BLVD DIVISA GE I S A N See Northeastern Waterfront Area Plan N RC AD ER O ST N SE D C I S C O B A Y ST 7T H See YBC Redevelopment Plan F U LT O N ST ST FELL S T T FO LS O M ST TO W N LINCOLN WAY M A R K E 16TH ST 101 See Mission Bay North and Mission Bay South Redevelopment Plans MISSION CASTRO POTRERO BLVD AVE 280 ST NORIEGA ST AVE SUNSET 24TH ST ST O C E A N 19TH CESAR CHAVEZ DR ST TARAVAL ST LA PORTO P A C I F I C IS SI ON ST 3R D S T SLOAT BLVD OC EAN AVE See Hunters Point Redevelopment Plan 101 280 M GEN EVA CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO SAN MATEO COUNTY AV E Generalized Commercial and Industrial Land Use Plan Major Shopping Business and Services Light Industry General Industry 0 Miles 1 MAP 01 Note: For Neighborhood Commercial Areas, see Map 5: Generalized Neighborhoods Commercial Land Use and Density Plan. Note: This map does not illustrate mixed-use areas, which may also contain elements of commerce and industry. SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Commerce & Industry Element | San Francisco General Plan 101 LU M LO ST MBARD BU See Chinatown Area Plan S ST 1 ST BROAD WAY ST 80 BA AVE Y BAY ST CO F EM BA R A BR See Van Ness Avenue Area Plan DERO ID GEARY BLVD DIVISA SS VAN NE See Rincon Hill Area Plan GE I S A N See Downtown Commercial Land Use in the Downtown Area Plan N RC AD N SE C ER O ST ST TO S 7T H D See YBC Redevelopment Plan I S C O B A Y F U LT O N ST ST FELL S T T FO LS O M W N LINCOLN WAY M A R K E 16TH ST 101 See Mission Bay North and Mission Bay South Redevelopment Plans T MISSION CASTRO POTRERO BLVD AVE 280 ST NORIEGA ST AVE SUNSET 24TH ST ST O C E A N 19TH CESAR CHAVEZ DR ST TARAVAL ST LA PORTO P A C I F I C IS SI ON ST 3R D S T SLOAT BLVD OC EAN AVE See Hunters Point Redevelopment Plan 101 280 M GEN EVA Candlestick Point Special Use District; see applicable Planning Code provisions. AV E CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO SAN MATEO COUNTY Generalized Commercial and Industrial Density Plan (Excludes Neighborhood Commercial Areas) Commercial (C-2) 3.6:1 FAR 0 Miles 1 MAP 02 Industrial (M-1, M-2, PDR) 3.0:1 FAR 4.0:1 FAR Res/Com (MU, UMU, SoMa) 2.5:1 FAR 3.0:1 FAR 4.0:1 FAR 5.0:1 FAR 6.0:1 FAR 7.5:1 FAR Note: In Commercial and Industrial districts, both FAR and dwelling unit density controls apply. In Mixed Residential Commercial districts, FAR limits apply to nonresidential uses and dwelling unit limits apply to residential uses. See Map 3 in the Housing Element for dwelling unit densities. an additional 25% FAR may be added on corner lots in non C-3 districts. Public use areas are excluded. FAR = Floor Area Ratio 5.0:1 FAR 6.0:1 FAR 9.0:1 FAR SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Commerce & Industry Element | San Francisco General Plan 101 LO M B A RD ST ST R A UNION ST 1 BROAD WAY ST ST 80 BA CALIFO RNIA Y BR BU S F ST GOUGH SS AVE VAN NE CLEMENT GEARY ST BLVD BALBOA ST M A R K E T S T ID F U LT O N ST HAIGH T ST M IS S IO N S T 6T FO LS O M ST GE I DIVISA S A CO LU M N N KTON STOC C T DERO S I S ST C O B A Y FILLMO RE ST H 16TH ST IRVING ST CHURCH ST 101 See Mission Bay North and Mission Bay South Redevelopment Plans VALENCIA ST BLVD AVE 20TH ST ST CASTRO NORIEGA ST SUNSET 24TH ST 280 19TH O C E A N CESAR CHAVEZ ST ST DR TARAVAL ST LA PORTO SLOAT BLVD P A C I F I C IS SI ON ST 3R D S T 280 M OC EAN AVE See Hunters Point Redevelopment Plan GEN EVA CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO SAN MATEO COUNTY AV E 101 Residential Service Areas of Neighborhood Commercial Districts and Uses Neighborhood Commercial District (Service Radius: 0.5 Mile) Commercial Service Areas Residential Areas Outside Service Boundaries 0 Miles 1 MAP 04 SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Commerce & Industry Element | San Francisco General Plan 101 LU M LO ST MBARD BU S ST 1 ST BROAD WAY ST AVE 80 BA Y BAY ST CO F EM BA R A BR ID DERO SS VAN NE GEARY BLVD DIVISA S T T GE I S A N N RC AD ER O C I S C O B A Y M A R K E ST SE N D 7T H ST F U LT O N ST ST FELL FO LS O M ST TO W N LINCOLN WAY 16TH ST 101 See Mission Bay North and Mission Bay South Redevelopment Plans MISSION CASTRO POTRERO BLVD AVE 280 ST NORIEGA ST AVE 24TH ST SUNSET ST O C E A N 19TH CESAR CHAVEZ DR ST TARAVAL ST LA PORTO SLOAT BLVD P A C I F I C OC EAN AVE M IS SI ON ST 101 GEN EVA CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO SAN MATEO COUNTY AV E 3R D S T Generalized Neighborhood Commercial Land Use and Density Plan Neighborhood Cluster Small Scale Neighborhood District Moderate Scale Neighborhood District Neighborhood Shopping Center Individual Neighborhood District Moderate Scale Transit Oriented Neighborhood District Individual Transit Oriented Neighborhood District 0 Miles 1 MAP 05 SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Central Waterfront Area Plan | San Francisco General Plan West SoMa K IN G S T * * * The shaded parcels are not part of the Redevelopment Project Areas and continue to be governed by the Mission Bay Guidelines and the Central Waterfront Plan. 3RD ST Showplace Square 7 T H Mission Bay See Mission Bay North and Mission Bay South Redevelopment Plans 16TH ST S T 16TH ST 280 MARIPOSA ST 18TH ST 101 POTRERO AVE See Showplace Square / Potrero Hill Area Plan 19TH P E N N S Y LV A N I A ST ST 20TH MINNESOTA INDIANA ST MICHIGAN ILLINOIS Potrero Hill 22ND ST ST ST ST ST TUBBS ST CENTRAL WATERFRONT ST ST Mission 23RD TENNESSEE ST 3RD ST 24TH 25TH ST 26TH ST CESAR CHAVEZ ST MARIN ST I Central Waterfront Planning Area MAP 01 SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Northeastern Waterfront Area Plan | San Francisco General Plan 45 Fisherman's Wharf Subarea Pier 39 35 J E F F E R S O N S T 33 B E A CH N O RT H P O I N T S T ST 31 B A Y S T 27 - 29 Base of Telegraph Hill Subarea 23 19 15 - 17 N C O L U F L O M B A R D S T B R O A D W A Y M B U R E M S S T A D R C B A O E R B A T T E R Y 9 S T 3 1 K E A R N Y S T O C K T O N S A N S O M E H Y D E Ferry Building Plaza Ferry Building Subarea GE V A N N E S S A V E S T P I N E G E A R Y M A R K E T S T S T S T 2 B S T S T S T 26 AY BR ID S T 1 22 1/2 S T 3 28 R D D S T S T 80 M I S S I O N S T H O W A R 30 S L S O M T H A R R I S O N S T S T 36 38 40 South Beach Subarea F O I B R A N N A N S T Northeastern Waterfront Planning Area 0 1,250 2,500 Feet MAP 01 SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Northeastern Waterfront Area Plan | San Francisco General Plan Fisherman's Wharf Subarea OS B E A C H S T 40-X 65-A N O RT H P O I N T S T N B A Y S T 65-X 65-X Base of Telegraph Hill Subarea 65-X V A N N E S S A V E F R B R O A D W A Y P I N E C O L U M B U S S M A T OS 84-E E M 84-E 65-X 84-E 275-E 40-X A D R C B A O E R S T 65-D-1 84-X-1 84-E OS 275-E S T O C K T O N S T S A N S O M E S T 275-E OS 84-E OS 200-S 84-X-1 84-J Ferry Building Subarea BR ID GE 84-E 84-X 84-X 200-S 65-X 84-X-2 84-E 84-X-2 2 B AY S T R K E T S T T M I S S I O N S 80 H O W A R D S T 40-X S L S O M T F O I Height and Bulk Plan H A R R I S O N S T 40-X South Beach Subarea B R Y A N T S T 0 1,250 2,500 Feet MAP 02 HEIGHT OS 40-X 50-X 65-X 65-D-1 65-A 84-X-2 84-X-1 84-X 84-J 84-E 105-F 150-X 200-S 220-G 275-E SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT Northeastern Waterfront Area Plan | San Francisco General Plan 80 I S T T 22 1/2 24 26 S R K E T T M A 28 ) (Rincon Hill) S A R D T P R O P E R T Y Industrial/ Public Trust 30 32 H S S I O N O W S I S O N T South Beach Subarea 36 M I S H A R R S Y A N T T 38 S S O M T B R S N N A N T P T O R T 40 F O L B R A S S E N D T O W N Industrial & Mixed Use 0 0.125 BA Y BR ID GE P R Y B A T T E O R T South Beach Subarea Generalized Land Use Map SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT N Y K E A R 3 R D P R O P E S P E A R R T Y S T 2 N D S S T B E A L E S T S T 1 S T S T T E M B A R C A D E R O 0.25 0.5 Miles MAP 06 ...
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This note was uploaded on 06/30/2010 for the course CY PLAN 118AC taught by Professor Lisafeldstein during the Summer '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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