lit3374pp2 - Introduction to the Bible Part Two: Other...

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Copyright Keith D. White, 2006 1 Introduction to the Bible Part Two: Other Books and Dates
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Copyright Keith D. White, 2006 2 Review The Hebrew Scriptures are an anthology of texts written by authors whose names were passed down to us by tradition. None of the works originally bore a title. The oldest piece of Scripture found dates to the 7 th century BC.
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Copyright Keith D. White, 2006 3 Other Jewish Texts The Hebrew Bible in its final form omitted a large body of Jewish texts, many of which survive in academic collections and have been translated. Since they don’t appear in and Jewish Bible, scholars reluctantly refer to them as pseudepigraphic texts .
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Copyright Keith D. White, 2006 4 Pseudepigrapha Pseudepigrapha , a Greek word meaning “with false superscription,” refers to books written under a pseudonym . These works were written between 250 B.C. and A.D. 200 — or in some cases as late as the Medieval period — and often preserve Jewish traditions of those periods.
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Copyright Keith D. White, 2006 5 Pseudepigrapha cont. None are canonical, but those written between 250 B.C. and 200 A.D. increase our awareness of Judaism during this formative period. Titles include The Testament of Adam, Jubilees, The Book of Enoch, The Apocalypse of Abraham, and The Life of Adam and Eve.
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Copyright Keith D. White, 2006 6 Enoch (200-150 B.C.) This fragment of Enoch was among the Dead Sea Scrolls. (See handout.) It is written in Aramaic, a language similar to Hebrew. Greek versions also survive.
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Copyright Keith D. White, 2006 7 Genesis 5:21–25 “When Enoch had lived sixty-five years, he became the father of Methuselah. Enoch walked with God after the birth of Methuselah three hundred years, and had other sons and daughters. Thus all the days of Enoch were three hundred sixty-five years. Enoch walked with God; then he was no more, because God took him.”
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8 Genesis 5:21–25 That is all we know about this Enoch. However, the reference to him walking with God and later God taking him with him, indicates that Enoch was unique. Perhaps the author of The Book of
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This note was uploaded on 07/01/2010 for the course LIT 3374 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of South Florida.

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lit3374pp2 - Introduction to the Bible Part Two: Other...

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