lit3374pp7

lit3374pp7 - An All-Israelite Epic The Birth of a Covenant...

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    An All-Israelite Epic The Birth of a Covenant
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    The Primeval History Primeval History Cosmogonic Tales Etiological Tales
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    The Ancestral History The migration from Mesopotamia of Abraham’s family. God’s promises to Abraham, his son Isaac, and his grandson Jacob. The rise of Jacob and his people in Egypt.
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    The People’s History Enslavement in Egypt to entrance into the land of Canaan (The Promised Land). The story of the Israelites’ struggle to reclaim the land God promised them. Exodus 1 – Joshua.
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    The Source Hypothesis The cosmogonic tale in Genesis 1.1 – 2.4a is the work of a writer whom scholars call E because he or she addresses God as Elohim (El-o-heem). E wrote in the northern kingdom of Israel in the 9 th century BCE.
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    The Yahwist This cosmogonic tale (Genesis 2.4b – 2.25) is the work of a writer whom scholars refer to as J because he addresses God as Yahweh . German scholars wrote this as Jahwe . J wrote in the Southern kingdom of Judah in the 10 th century BCE.
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    The Deuteronomist D, for “Deuteronomist” (ca. 650 BCE), refers to the author of Deuteronomy through 2 Kings. The author’s historical account demonstrates why the Israelites and Judeans suffer. God’s Jerusalem is destroyed twice. Can he truly be an omnipotent God? D’s history has God using foreign invaders as his tool to teach Israel.
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    Two More Perspectives P, for Priestly (ca. 550 BCE), refers to those books or passages of the Bible concerning religious ritual such as how priests behave, dress, and perform in the Jerusalem Temple. Leviticus is the ultimate expression of P’s work, but his additions appear in many of the Hebrew Scriptures.
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    Some Conclusions The Source Hypothesis is just that — an hypothesis and not a theory. A popular introduction is the book Who Wrote the Bible? (Richard F. Friedman) Nevertheless, the Source Hypothesis is still the best explanation for the duplications and multiple perspective in the Bible, especially in the Torah.
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    Redactor The Source Hypothesis requires a redactor, an unknown person or persons who compiled these sources into the Hebrew Scriptures. For the redactor, or R, often
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lit3374pp7 - An All-Israelite Epic The Birth of a Covenant...

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