lit3374pp10 - Psalms Praise the Lord...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
  Copyright 2006 Keith D. White Psalms Praise the Lord
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
  Copyright 2006 Keith D. White Songs and Praises The title Psalms derives from Greek psalmos, “song,” (pl. psalmoi “songs.”) The Greek had translated psalmos from the Hebrew mizmor , “song.” A collection of psalms is a psalter, from the Greek psalterion , a type of harp. The Hebrew word for Psalms is Tehillim , “Praises.”
Background image of page 2
  Copyright 2006 Keith D. White David the Psalmist Tradition holds that David was a great musician, and so many of the psalms were later attributed to him. “And whenever the evil spirit from God came upon Saul, David took the lyre and played it with his hand, and Saul would be relieved and feel better, and the evil spirit would depart from him.” —1 Samuel 16
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
  Copyright 2006 Keith D. White Collections of Praises However, our book of Psalms is a collection of subcollections of psalms written between the 5 th and 2 nd centuries B.C.E. For example, Elohim outnumbers YHWH by nearly four to one in Psalms 42-83, That grouping is called the Elohistic Psalter. Also, Psalm 72 ends with the line, “The prayers of David son of Jesse are ended,” and yet we still have 78 more psalms.
Background image of page 4
  Copyright 2006 Keith D. White Other Psalmists Other Psalms bear the superscription of what appear to be professional psalmists for the Jerusalem Temple: Asaph and the Korahites Not included in the Bible are the 18 “Psalms of Solomon,” a collection written after the Roman invasion in 63. B.C.E. to explain why the country continues to suffer (the sin of even a single person can bring punishment to an entire country). The Apocrypha has a 151 st psalm ascribed to David, but it was written sometime during the Persian period (6 th – 4 th cent. B.C.E.)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
  Copyright 2006 Keith D. White Duplications Other evidence of subcollections is the duplication of certain psalms or parts of palms. For example, Ps. 53 is a duplicate of Ps. 14. Ps. 70.2-6 = Ps. 40.14-18, Ps. 71:1-3 = Ps. 31.2-4, Ps. 108 appears in Ps. 57:8-12 and 60:7-14. Obviously there was more then one psalter when the modern one was canonized.
Background image of page 6
  Copyright 2006 Keith D. White Tradition Busted So, like many popular misconceptions, the book of Psalms was not written by David. It is interesting to investigate how misconceptions like that above or the notion that Solomon wrote Song of Solomon/Songs, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes arise. The Bible does little if anything to create or to maintain these traditions.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Copyright 2006 Keith D. White Context I suspect that, as so many people have told me, few people read the entire Bible. Although the Bible is an anthology, no part of it should be read out of context. Context
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/01/2010 for the course LIT 3374 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of South Florida.

Page1 / 45

lit3374pp10 - Psalms Praise the Lord...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online