BIS 110 Lab #2

BIS 110 Lab #2 - Gupta, 1 Introduction to Cell Culture Lab...

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Gupta, 1 Introduction to Cell Culture Lab Report 2 Shivali Gupta 7/14/2009 BIS 110 Section 002 MAK
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Abstract: Cells are the fundamental units of life; without cells life would be non-existent. There are diverse forms of cells: prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and among these two groups the bacteria, protists, animal cells and plant cells are categorized. Different cells grow at different rates in response to their different environmental features. This report focuses on the ability of bacteria, E.coli , to grow and divide under specific environments, such as, the absence and presence of antibiotics, temperature, and enough space to allow bacteria to multiply. Growth of the bacterial cells can be monitored using spectrometry, which measures the optical density or the absorbance of a solution. The growth rate of E. coli was measured in the absence of antibiotics and in the presence of three different antibiotics: Ampicillin, Streptomycin, and Chloramphenicol. Another method that will be applied in the determination of bacteria cell growth is the process of streaking bacteria from a liquid culture onto an agar medium in a petri dish, this process allows for colonies of bacteria to be produced onto the plates. The inspection of the bacterial growth rate using both of these processes indicates that bacteria are very likely to grow in absence of antibiotics and that the presence of antibiotics reduces bacteria growth rate. Introduction: Typical bacteria illustrate growth characteristics usually represented by four stages: the lag phase, exponential phase, stationary phase, and death phase. The lag phase is commonly known as the time in which bacteria adapt themselves to their environmental conditions; it is the period where bacteria mature and are not yet able to divide. The exponential phase is where the bacterial cell population doubles. Exponential growth cannot continue indefinitely, because the medium is soon depleted of nutrient and enriched with wastes. The stationary phase is where the growth rate slows down due to the lack of nutrients, a higher accumulation of toxic wastes, and limited space to accommodate all the bacterial cells. In the stationary phase the number of bacterial cells remains constant, therefore no growth occurs. Last but not the least the death phase is where the bacterial cells die. We will examine the ability of E.coli to grow and divide under specific environments, such as, the absence and presence of three different antibiotics: Ampicillin, Streptomycin, and Chloramphenicol, and temperature. In the absence of antibiotics bacterial cell growth will continue until nutrients are completely depleted. The effect of the ampicillin on the growth rate of E.coli will slowly show any affect, if any. The antibiotic,
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This note was uploaded on 07/02/2010 for the course BIO 110 taught by Professor Bryan during the Spring '10 term at UCM.

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BIS 110 Lab #2 - Gupta, 1 Introduction to Cell Culture Lab...

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