BIS 110 Lab #1

BIS 110 Lab #1 - Gupta, 1 In t roduction to M icroscopy L...

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Gupta, 1 Introduction to Microscopy Lab Report 1 Shivali Gupta 7/14/2009 BIS 110 Section 002 MAK
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Abstract: Microscopy is a widely used technique that is utilized to study cells in cell biology. This report represents the differences among two different types of microscopy: light microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, observed during the examination of bacterial specimens, tissue sections and stained cancerous cervical epithelial, HeLa cells, using the techniques involved with fluorescence and light microscopy under certain magnifications. The bacterial specimens and the tissue sections were inspected under the light microscope using three different objectives: low power objective (10X), high power objective (40X), and oil immersion lens (100X). We observed that as the magnification was increased, increase in resolution resulted. During the examination of the HeLa cells we were specifically observing the mitochondria and the cytoskeletal actin organelles, under the fluorescence microscope. These organelles were viewable under the microscope because specific fluorescent dyes were used to stain the two separate organelles. The fluorescence microscope allowed us to view the details of the organelles, especially the cytoskeletal actin; we were able to see the structure of the cytoskeletal actin in the cell. The examination of the different cells with the aid of light microscopy and fluorescence microscopy indicates that light microscopy is mostly effective when looking at small detailed imagery of the cell overall; however, it is indicated that fluorescence microscopy is effective when examining specific organelles within a cell. Introduction: A light microscope is an instrument that requires bright light and magnifying lens (objective lens and ocular lens), allowing one to inspect small objects in finer detail than the naked eye allows or is capable of. Specimens examined under the light microscope can be living or dead, but often needed to be stained with a colored dye for the specimens to appear visible. Specific parts of the cells can be stained
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Gupta, 3 such as DNA, lipids, cytoskeleton, etc., using the various stains available (Light Microscopy). Fluorescence microscopy is a crucial technique in the study of the cell biology. In fluorescence microscopy, the sample being examined is the light source itself. The basic task of the fluorescence microscope is to radiate excitation light onto the specimen, and then capture the weaker light emitted to create fluorescent image of the specimen of interest. The microscope has a filter that only allows radiation pass through with the desired wavelength that matches the fluorescing sample. The radiation collides with the atoms in the specimen and electrons are excited to a higher energy level (The Fluorescence Microscope). When these high energy electrons return to a lower level, they emit light. This light emitted by electrons is then captured and separated from the brighter excitation light, and further utilized
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This note was uploaded on 07/02/2010 for the course BIO 110 taught by Professor Bryan during the Spring '10 term at UCM.

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BIS 110 Lab #1 - Gupta, 1 In t roduction to M icroscopy L...

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