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TeamD.Week4.FinalPaper - Salary Cap Running Head: THE NEED...

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Salary Cap 1 Running Head: THE NEED FOR A SALARY CAP IN MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL The Need for a Salary Cap in Major League Baseball Jon Humber, Joseph L Lasher, Mindy Rivera, Sarena Francis and Sylvia Vasquez University of Phoenix
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Salary Cap 2 Abstract It is known that there is no salary cap set in place in the Major League Baseball Association, and many will argue about the need or desire for one. Others will disagree completely with the idea and refuse to accept it for what it is. A salary cap can enable teams to play on a “fair” playing field instead of one team with better players than other teams simply because of a high team payroll. However, there is a bit of research to be done to prove the salary cap would be beneficial and not a waste as some may see it to be.
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Salary Cap 3 The Need for a Salary Cap in Major League Baseball In everyday America and across the globe, children and adults alike can be found playing some sport or watching a sport on television or in an arena or stadium. The teams have organizations and owners responsible for setting the rules and regulations the team are to follow, and determining the conditions under which the team or player can play. The Major League Baseball Association is worth billions of dollars but for each team to have the best players is not always easy. The cost of a player’s salary is in connection with the price of a seat in the stands to watch the player and the game. A salary cap would easily level the playing field but the players may not see the cap on salary as a beneficial action to take because of a lifestyle the player has and does not want to change. A decrease in salary for the some of the players with high salaries will benefit the fans and the players who have smaller salaries. The question on many peoples’ minds is if it is worth taking away from the rich to give to the poor to make the game more equal. The research in this paper shows that a decrease in one player’s salary isn’t always a fix-all for other players’ inabilities in the sport. Calculating Central Tendency For the research conducted to determine if the MLB should employ a salary cap, the use of descriptive statistics is used during analysis. One important type of descriptive statistics is central tendency. Doane and Seward (2007) define central tendency as the statistic that identifies the middle or typical value within a data range. Central tendency is an important statistic to measure because the data is typically relevant to the research as opposed to data that is extremely higher or lower from the middle. Researchers will use six different ways to measure central tendency mean, median, mode, midrange, geometric mean, and trimmed mean. All six are used
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Salary Cap 4 to measure the middle data, but in different ways. All six measures have positives and negatives associated with the methods and researchers should not entirely rely on one measurement. When deciding if a salary cap would be beneficial, MLB would look at central tendencies
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TeamD.Week4.FinalPaper - Salary Cap Running Head: THE NEED...

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