Elements of Chemical Reaction ering 4th Ed - H. Scott Fogler 52

Elements of Chemical Reaction ering 4th Ed - H. Scott Fogler 52

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20 Mole Balances Chap. ' Reactor sizing 1. Sketch the concentration prof le. 2. Derive an equation relating the reactor volume to the entering and exitrng concentrations of A, the rate constant R, and the volumetric Row rate v. 3. Determine the reactor volume necessary to reduce the exiting concentration t~ 10% of the entering concentration when the volumetric ffow rate is I( dm3/rnin (i.e., litenlrnin) and the specific reaction rate, k. is 0.23 mrrr-' . 1. Speciec A is consumed as we move down the reactor, and as a result. both the molar flow rate of A and the concentration of A will decrease as we move. Because the volumetric flow rate is constant, v = v,, one can use Equation (1-8) to obtain the concentration of A,
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Unformatted text preview: C, = F , ~ U ~ , and then by compariwn with Figure 1-12 plot the concenrration of A as a function of rertctor volume as shown in Figure El-1.1. Figure EI-1.1 Concentration prufile. 2. Derive an equation relating Y v,, k, CAo, and CA. For a tubular reactor, the mole balance on species A Cj = A) was shown to be given by Equation ( 1 - 1 1). Then for species A (j = A) results For a fist-order reaction, the rate law (discussed in Chapter 3) is Because the volumetric flow rate. u , is constant ( u = uo). as it is for most liquid- phase reactions, Multiplying both sides of Equation (EI-1.2) by minus one and then substituting Equation (E 1-1. I) yields...
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