Electric Circuits 8th Edition 103

Electric Circuits 8th Edition 103 - shown in the figure,...

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sLrmmary 79 once aqain, after some atgebraic maniputation (see ProbLem 3.70), the expression for R1 can be reduced to RzR: D (1 + 2o\1 Rl :-R,. ' (I+o)' (3.70) i3 The resutts of our anaLysis are sumnarized in Tabte 3.1. NqTE: Assess your undeRtanding of the Prddical Petspective by trying Chopter Problens 3.71-3.73. Rz R3 (t + 2o)zoR1 4(I + o)' (1 + 2o\!R1 I + 2d\a a *'F"' 5ummary . Sedes resistorc can be combined to obtain a single equivalent resistance according to the equation R"q=)Rr:Rr+R2+. +R&. (See page 58.) . Pamll€l resistors can be combined to obtain a single equivalent resistance according to the equation | :r I I r R.q e Ri Rr R2 Rfr When just two resistors are in parallel, the equation lbr equi\dlcnl resisrance can he simplified ro gi!e .R R, ,."q Rr + R2. (See pages 59-60.) . When voltage is divided between sedes resistors,
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Unformatted text preview: shown in the figure, the voltage across each resistor can be found according to the equations ,,- Rl ,, "' Rr + Rr'' R: ir" * = " r * & - ' " (See page 62.) Rr . When currelt is divided between para]lel resistors, as shown in the figure, the curent Urrough each resistor can be found according to the equations . R l 2 '' Rr + tRr'" R1-' Rr + Rr'" (See page 64.) l ) ' r l n, nl Rj t ] ' = - ? ) ' ' Kcq where oi is the voltage drop across the resistance Rl and o is the voltage drop across the se es-connected resistances whose equivalent resistance is R.q. (See page 66.) Voltage division is a ciicdt analysis tool thar is used to find the voltage drop across a single resjstance from a collection of series-coDnected resistances wheD the vol! ase droD across the collection is known:...
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This note was uploaded on 07/05/2010 for the course EE 100 taught by Professor Boser during the Spring '07 term at Berkeley.

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