Chpaters_3-4-5_SS10_stud

Chpaters_3-4-5_SS10_stud - Chapter 3, 4, and 5 Functions...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Chapter 3, 4, and 5 Stress – Modifiers Health Stress Modifiers Functions Sources Assessme nt Social Suppor t Personalit y Stress Reduction Interventio ns Coping Physiolog y
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Adages “That which does not kill us, makes us stronger” “God” does not give people more than they can handle”
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Defining Stress Sources? Functions?
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Sources of stress? Developme nt
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Sources of Stress The Good Get married Have children Buy a new home Go on The Bad Break a leg Spouse loses job The Ugly Nasty car accident Bankruptc y Obj10 Obj101 Obj102
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Obj103 Obj104 Obj105 Obj106 Obj107 Obj108 Obj109 Obj1 0 Obj1 1 Obj1 2 Obj1 3 Who
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Types of Obj1 4 Obj1 5 Obj1 6 Obj1 7 Emotion al Environ mental Injury Physical Illness Obj1 8 Obj1 9 Career Pressures Obj120
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Approaches to Stress Stressor Stimulus Distress, Strain Response Coping
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Stress “ Stress is any event in which environmental or internal demands (or both) tax or exceed the adaptive resources of an individual.” (Lazarus & Launier, 1978). “Circumstances in which transactions lead a person to perceive a discrepancy between the physical or psychological demands of a situation and the resources of his or her biological, psychological or social systems (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984b)
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Stress Response
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A bit of stress is good Yerkes-Dodson law
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Too much stress is not good. .. Selye (1950s) Role of neuroendocrine factors in the role of disease Animal model 1. Alarm reaction Fight of Flight 2. Resistance Diseases of adaptation 3. Exhaustion Weakened immunity
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Walter Cannon (1932) “Fight or Flight” In the face of Stress Fight or flight response Protective/adaptive/ hardwired response
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Stress Response in Humans Endocrine system regulates the secretion of hormones in the blood stream Hormonal secretion regulate reactions in order to bring about an appropriate response by the organism Endocrine system works along side of nervous system & Stress response
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Hypothalamus Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) Axis Adrenal Gland & Key organ in the stress response Upon adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) release from pituitary gland, adrenal cortex releases cortisol and medulla releases epinephrine (adrenaline) into the blood.
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Acute Stress Respons e Sympatheti c Nervous System Hypothalami c-Pituitary- Adrenal Axis Cortisol NE/E Peripheral Nervous System Endocrine System Interface Endocrine
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Peripheral Nervous System Involves Sensory Systems, Motor System & Involuntary Physiological Responses
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Sympathetic Nervous system
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SNS activation and Physiologic Signs of Immediate Changes Increased cardiac output Increased circulation Increased BP, RR Increased sweating Piloerection Pupil dilatation Decreased salivation Decreased gastric motility Hyperalertness Increased blood sugar Use of blood glucose Decreased stored energy Increased fatty acids Increased metabolism
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This note was uploaded on 07/05/2010 for the course PSY 338 taught by Professor Lombardo during the Spring '10 term at Oakland University.

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Chpaters_3-4-5_SS10_stud - Chapter 3, 4, and 5 Functions...

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