honbio_plants

honbio_plants - Mr. Jones Honors Bio Plants Are you my...

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Mr. Jones Honors Bio Plants Chapters: 29*, 30*, 31*, 32, 33* * = abridged “Are you my frond?” SORI
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Plants and Agriculture
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Cereals; 80% of kcal of human diet, rice, oat, wheat, sorghum, rye, millet, corn
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Root crops; potatoes, carrots, radishes, rutabegas, turnips
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Fruits, vegetables, nuts
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Spices (usually tropical, non leaf based); pepper, cinnamon, paprika, herbs (usually leaf based);
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Medicine from Plants
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QUININE . Uses. FYI Cinchona is a bitter stomachic and has astringent properties. It may sometimes cause vomiting and if taken over long periods may give rise to symptoms of cinchonism. Quinine works by attacking the parasite that causes malaria. Plasmodium falciparum , feeds on red blood cells. It can easily digest hemoglobin but can't handle the heme groups that are released when the protein is degraded. These heme groups are toxic to the parasite so they are stored in an inactive form inside a membrane-bound organelle called a digestive vacuole. Quinine interferes with this storage causing the hemes to remain free where they poison the cell. The exact mechanism is unknown.
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Yam : Cortisone: FYI Cortisol is a corticosteroid hormone or glucocorticoid produced by the adrenal cortex, that is part of the adrenal gland. It is usually referred to as the "stress hormone" as it is involved in response to stress and anxiety. It increases blood pressure and blood sugar, and reduces immune responses. Various synthetic forms of cortisol are used to treat a variety of different illnesses. The most well-known of these are a natural metabolic intermediary of cortisol named hydrocortisone.
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White Willow : acetylsalicylic acid (Asprin) FYI Aspirin has an antiplatelet, or "anti-coagulate", effect by inhibiting thromboxane prostaglandins, which under normal circumstances bind platelet molecules together to repair damaged blood vessels. This is why aspirin is used in long-term, low doses to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clot formation in people at high risk for developing blood clots.
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Yew : taxol. FYI Taxol (Paclitaxel is drug name) interferes with the normal function of microtubule breakdown. Whereas drugs like colchicine cause the depolymerization of microtubules, paclitaxel arrests their function by having the opposite effect; it hyper-stabilizes their structure. This destroys the cell's ability to use its cytoskeleton in a flexible manner. Specifically, paclitaxel binds to the β subunit of tubulin. Tubulin is the "building block" of microtubules, and the binding of paclitaxel locks these building blocks in place. The resulting microtubule/paclitaxel complex does not have the ability to disassemble.
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Plant animal interactions. Some flowers, though natural selection, have come to resemble predators or pollinators
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Harmful plants: Allergies Early Spring; Deciduous tree pollen from oak, birch and sycamore Late spring/summer; Mostly grass pollen Fall: Weed pollen. Depending on the area of North America, these weeds include ragweed, sagebrush, pigweed, tumbleweed (Russian thistle) and cocklebur.
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Plants all…. . Are Multicellular photoautotrophs
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This note was uploaded on 07/06/2010 for the course BIO 255 taught by Professor Patel during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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honbio_plants - Mr. Jones Honors Bio Plants Are you my...

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