ANTH106-week4-lecture1-Cannabis-2010

ANTH106-week4-lecture1-Cannabis-2010 - Cannabis ANTH106

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Cannabis ANTH106 Photo by Dradd.  http://www.flickr.com/photos/dradd/2626631657/ . © Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
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CANNABIS BACKGROUND Botanical names : Cannabis sativa and Cannabis Indica Active ingredient : Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol Main forms: a. Marijuana: dried flowering tops and leaves of harvested plant b. Sinsemilla marijuana: female plants, not fertilised c. Hashish (hash): dried cannabis resin and compressed flowers d. Hashish oil: high potency substance extracted from hashish e. Hemp: use (mainly fibre from plant stalk) for industrial purposes. Photos: Sinsemilla by Senor Lebowski,  http://www.flickr.com/photos/adolescente_de_30/280919710/  . Hemp field by CSLP,  http://www.flickr.com/photos/44244119@N08/4072668122/  .  Hemp fibre by -Weng- ,  http://www.flickr.com/photos/w3ngie/3813756505/   All: © Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
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CANNABIS: A BRIEF HISTORY Originated in Central Asia Mentioned in ancient medical and religious Chinese and Indian texts In the West cannabis used (as hemp fibre) initially for practical purposes : e.g. ship sails and ropes and cloth Right: hemp sailing rig from U.S.S. Constitution. Photo by Andrea Schwartz, © Creative Commons, some rights reserved. W.B. O’Shaughnessy is credited with introduction of medical use of cannabis. Between 1842-1900 over 100 reports published on therapeutic qualities of cannabis. Far right: William Brooke O’Shaughnessy, courtesy U.S. National Library of Medicine. Recreational use in the West: a. French Hashish Club b. Hashish bars in Europe and USA (second half 19 th cent.)
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Himmelstein (‘From Killer Weed to Drop-Out Drug’ LR 34): ‘Moral entrepreneurs’: moral crusaders who play a key role in drug legislation by influencing public images of a drug (e.g. Harry Anslinger). Right: Harry Anslinger, photo courtesy U.S. Library of Congress ‘Social locus’: the social position (e.g. class, ethnic, generational) position of the drug users. ‘Symbolic politics’: drugs and drug prohibition as ‘symbolic counters in wider social conflicts’. Drugs as political scapegoats. See the  Reefer Madness  trailer at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1jB7RBGVGk SYMBOLIC DIMENSIONS OF CANNABIS LEGISLATION
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Cannabis ( ganja ) in Jamaica and class conflict : See Rubin & Comitas The Ganja Complex , 1975) and M. Booth Cannabis: A History. Introduced by indentured Indian labourers in 1830s and quickly spread to black population (former slaves). Ganja : a scapegoat for elite and middle-class anxieties about deviant behaviour (crime, violence, laziness) of poor working class (including Rastafarians). 1937 Anslinger (FBN) pressured British colonial authorities in
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ANTH106-week4-lecture1-Cannabis-2010 - Cannabis ANTH106

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