The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing

The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing - Thomas S. Kane If...

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Thomas S. Kane
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If you purchased this book without a cover, you should be aware that this book is stolen property. It was reported as "unsold and destroyed" to the publisher, and neither the author nor the publisher has received any payments for this "stripped book."
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Acknowledgments This book is based on The Oxford Guide to Writing: A Rhet- oric and Handbook for College Students, and thanks are due once more to those who contributed to that book: my friend and colleague Leonard J. Peters; Professors Miriam Baker of Dowling College, David Hamilton of the University of Iowa, Robert Lyons and Sandra Schor of Queens College of the City University of New York, and Joseph Trimmer of Ball State University, all of whom read the manuscript and con- tributed perceptive comments; Ms. Cheryl Kupper, who copyedited that text with great thoroughness and care; and John W. Wright, my editor at the Oxford University Press. For the present edition I am again grateful to Professor Leonard J. Peters and to John W. Wright. In addition I wish to thank William P. Sisler and Joan Bossert, my editors at Oxford University Press, who encouraged, criticized, and im- proved, as good editors do. Kittery Point, Maine T.S.K. December 1987
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Contents Introduction 3 1. Subject, Reader, and Kinds of Writing 5 2. Strategy and Style 9 3. Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics 13 PART 1 The Writing Process 4. Looking for Subjects 19 5. Exploring for Topics 23 6. Making a Plan 29 7. Drafts and Revisions 34 17 PART II. 8. 9. 10. 11. The Essay 43 Beginning 45 Closing 60 Organizing the Middle Point of View, Persona, 67 and Tone 74 PART 3 The Expository Paragraph 87 12. Basic Structure 89 13. Paragraph Unity 95 14. Paragraph Development: (1) Illustration and Restatement 106
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8 CONTENTS 15. Paragraph Development: (2) Comparison, Contrast, and Analogy 114 16. Paragraph Development: (3) Cause and Effect 125 17. Paragraph Development: (4) Definition, Analysis, and Qualification 132 PART 4. The Sentence 149 18. The Sentence: A Definition 151 19. Sentence Styles 161 20. The Well-Written Sentence: (1) Concision 191 21. The Well-Written Sentence: (2) Emphasis 200 22. The Well-Written Sentence: (3) Rhythm 223 23. The Well-Written Sentence: (4) Variety 234 PART v. Diction 241 24. Meaning 243 25. Clarity and Simplicity 262 26. Concision 281 27. Figurative Language 295 28. Unusual Words and Collocations 325 29. Improving Your Vocabulary: Dictionaries 336 vi. Description and Narration 349 30. Description 351 31. Narration 366 PART VII. Punctuation 377 Introduction 379 32. Stops 383 33. The Other Marks 417 Name Index 439 Subject Index 445
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The New Oxford Guide to Writing
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Introduction Two broad assumptions underlie this book: (1) that writing is a rational activity, and (2) that it is a valuable activity. To say that writing is rational means nothing more than that it is an exercise of mind requiring the mastery of tech- niques anyone can learn. Obviously, there are limits: one can- not learn to write like Shakespeare or Charles Dickens. You can't become a genius by reading a book.
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The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing - Thomas S. Kane If...

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