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Syllabus2 - Economics 100A Microeconomics Course...

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Economics 100A - Microeconomics Course Description Course design Instructor: Rapha¨el Giraud (University of Franche-Comt´e, France) Visiting Assistant Professor at UCB Current office: 697 Evans hall. Current Phone number : TBA email: [email protected] Provisional office hours: Tu 10-12 AM and Th 2-4 PM, by appointment. Time: Fall 2007, TuTh 8-9:30A Location: 155 DWINELLE Credits: 4 Sections: see http://emlab.berkeley.edu/econ/ugrad/fugsec.shtml Topic and Objectives This course will introduce the basic concepts and results of microeconomic theory, in a not-too-formal way. Specifically, we will insist on concepts and reasoning, most of the time illustrated by graphs, rather than on mathematical technique (which is emphasized more in Econ 101A). However, we will use some simple mathematical tools (calculus and first or second degree equations mostly) in order to be able to show how the concepts can be manipulated to yield new insights. Specifically, the main topics of the course will be agents interacting on markets, under more or less perfect competition, and how these interactions can be considered from a descriptive or a normative point of view. Ideally, at the end of this class, students should know the basic models and results of microeconomic theory and above all be able to apply them to analyze real world economic problems, i.e. be able to know which model is the relevant one for a specific problem and what predictions one can make from this knowledge. Given these objectives, the course is suitable not only, of course, for students wanting to take economics as their major, but also from students of other backgrounds having other main interests who want to be able to analyze the economic problems they come across. One should be aware that economic 1
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reasoning is pervasive in many areas of the social sciences, and therefore understanding it can only be an asset. To some extent, the only really necessary prerequisite of the course if to have taken an introductory calculus course (Math 1A or 16A). However it is better to have followed an introductory economics course (Economics 1). From what I gather from past courses, part of the course material discussed in Econ 100A will be already known and serve as a review, e.g. the supply and demand model; other parts of the material will be new (like consumer and production theories). I (the instructor) am French. I will of course do my best to speak an as correct and understandable as possible english, but of course, I may falter from time to time, and I apologize if your English-speaking ears suffer from it, Do not hesitate to ask if you do not understand something I say. Course Material The text for the course will be Microeconomics, 6th Edition by Robert S. Pindyck and Daniel L. Rubinfeld, Pearsons-Prentice-Hall. This book is temporarily out of stock at Pearsons Ed, however according to the publisher its expected availability date is August, 27 and it will be shipped to bookshops as soon as possible after this date. In the mean-
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