Lecture_04_15.ppt - Innovation in Sports Technology ®...

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Unformatted text preview: Innovation in Sports Technology ® Developing Marketable Products Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Two Organizations Consulting ® Academic ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 2 Sports Innovation @ MIT Founded in 1999 • Center for Sports Innovation Mission focused on undergraduate education • Innovation and product development • Engineering, communication skills, and teamwork Award winning projects • Departmental research awards • ispo student innovation awards High student demand • Turn away more than 20 students a term “[If MIT] can continue to provide innovative projects as it has been, the MIT students will gain tremendous opportunities for engineering creativity, personal growth and industry perspective from the program. ...No other department at MIT combines the excitement of sports with the intricacy of engineering. …I found the experience impacted my life personally as well as academically.” Chi-An Wang, MIT Class 2001 ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 3 Sports Innovation @ MIT Sample Project List Golf • Golf Ball Aerodynamics • Custom Golf Club Fitting • Golf Trajectory Simulation • Club-Ball Impact Acoustics Footwear • Triathlon Shoe • Ultra Marathon Shoe • Shoe Sole Design Outdoor • Carabiner Failure • Ski Boot Testing • Climbing Rope Test Device • Ice Screw Testing • Ski Camber Testing In-line Skate Skating • Vibration Transmission • Motion Efficiency ® Cycling • Bike Vibrations • Aerodynamics of Riders, Frames, Wheels, Components, Accessories Equipment Performance • Sports Padding • Softballs • Tennis Rackets • Speed Skating • Baseball Gloves • Baseball Bats • Hockey Pucks Fitness Equipment • Abdominal Training • Core Stability Training • Sensor Gloves • Body Gym © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 4 Sports Innovation Group LLC ® Mission • Provide expertise in the development of innovative new sports products utilizing advanced technology to enhance the sports experience for athletes and/or spectators in academic, start-up, small-medium enterprise, and large corporate cultures Services • Consulting Innovation Product development Engineering design and analysis Strategic planning Intellectual property • Education Development and delivery of curricula in entrepreneurship, innovation and sports engineering Directing sports innovation projects at MIT • Lectures Engineering education and science of sports Innovation and product development process ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 5 Corporate Clients Reebok • NFL, NHL and NBA apparel innovation Cleveland Golf • Driver design Anonymous sponsor • MLB broadcast enhancement concepts Cervelo, Specialized, CSC, LS, SlipStream … • Wind tunnel testing of cyclists and equipment Thinc Design • Technical advisor, Connecticut Science Center sport science exhibit Expert witness - patent infringement • Golf grips • Golf balls • Golf clubs ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 6 Director/Advisor to Start-ups Emerging companies developing innovative sports products • • • • Koko Fitness iClub Smarter Bear Nuumo Footwear • • • • SmartSports Worldslide Farrell Sports Concepts Hydro~Blade Provide • • • • Business and strategic planning Development of strategic alliances Assistance with raising capital Technology assessment and development "Our business is comprised equally of technology and sport. While Boston enjoys vast intelligence resources, most specialists are singular in focus. High above the crowd is Kim Blair. His broad vision and commitment to innovation exemplifies the very spirit of sport: excellence and achievement. His contributions to the industry will be seen for years to come." Corrine Vitolo, CEO, SmartSports, Inc. ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 7 Innovation in Sports Technology ® Developing Marketable Products Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Innovation What is innovation? ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 9 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 10 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 11 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 12 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … • One of the most abused buzzwords of the last decade ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 13 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … • One of the most abused buzzwords of the last decade Which is now being replaced by terms like “design thinking” ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 14 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … • One of the most abused buzzwords of the last decade Which is now being replaced by terms like “design thinking” • Suggests breakthrough ways of thinking and new ways to approach a problem ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 15 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … • One of the most abused buzzwords of the last decade Which is now being replaced by terms like “design thinking” • Suggests breakthrough ways of thinking and new ways to approach a problem Where is the deliverable? ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 16 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … • One of the most abused buzzwords of the last decade Which is now being replaced by terms like “design thinking” • Suggests breakthrough ways of thinking and new ways to approach a problem Where is the deliverable? Innovation is NOT … ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 17 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … • One of the most abused buzzwords of the last decade Which is now being replaced by terms like “design thinking” • Suggests breakthrough ways of thinking and new ways to approach a problem Where is the deliverable? Innovation is NOT … • R&D, although R&D is part of the innovation process ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 18 Innovation What is innovation? • Quickly think of your first response • Now think again for a minute and see if you have a different thought Innovation is … • One of the most abused buzzwords of the last decade Which is now being replaced by terms like “design thinking” • Suggests breakthrough ways of thinking and new ways to approach a problem Where is the deliverable? Innovation is NOT … • R&D, although R&D is part of the innovation process • Invention, nor the “eureka” moment ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 19 Innovation Innovation is … • A process that embodies empathy and collaboration Begins with research to identify needs, wants, and problems Addresses them in a way that draws upon many different disciplines and functions ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 20 Innovation Innovation is … • A process that embodies empathy and collaboration Begins with research to identify needs, wants, and problems Addresses them in a way that draws upon many different disciplines and functions • Multidisciplinary Social sciences, design, engineering, finance, operations, … ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 21 Innovation Innovation is … • A process that embodies empathy and collaboration Begins with research to identify needs, wants, and problems Addresses them in a way that draws upon many different disciplines and functions • Multidisciplinary Social sciences, design, engineering, finance, operations, … • Innovation breaks through a business-as-usual mindset Reveals an array of opportunities with a high probability of success ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 22 Innovation Innovation is … • A process that embodies empathy and collaboration Begins with research to identify needs, wants, and problems Addresses them in a way that draws upon many different disciplines and functions • Multidisciplinary Social sciences, design, engineering, finance, operations, … • Innovation breaks through a business-as-usual mindset Reveals an array of opportunities with a high probability of success Innovation needs … A LEADER ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 23 Innovation Innovation is … • A process that embodies empathy and collaboration Begins with research to identify needs, wants, and problems Addresses them in a way that draws upon many different disciplines and functions • Multidisciplinary Social sciences, design, engineering, finance, operations, … • Innovation breaks through a business-as-usual mindset Reveals an array of opportunities with a high probability of success Innovation needs … A LEADER • If everybody is in charge - nobody is Little gets accomplished, if anything at all ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 24 Innovation Innovation is … • A process that embodies empathy and collaboration Begins with research to identify needs, wants, and problems Addresses them in a way that draws upon many different disciplines and functions • Multidisciplinary Social sciences, design, engineering, finance, operations, … • Innovation breaks through a business-as-usual mindset Reveals an array of opportunities with a high probability of success Innovation needs … A LEADER • If everybody is in charge - nobody is Little gets accomplished, if anything at all • The person responsible for assembling and directing the cross-functional teams and defining deliverables Innovation needs to be an organization wide effort Not the product of yet another silo ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 25 Problem statement 30,000 customer products launched every year • 90% fail 80% of companies believe they deliver a superior customer experience • 8% of their customers agree It is not about the product, it is about the experience Empathy and collaboration • Need to understand the customer and consumer • Engineers and/or designers cannot address this alone ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 26 Sports products vs. high tech industries A bridge too far? ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Sports products vs. high tech industries Sports Products Management of Innovation, R&D, PD Product Use Product Shelf Life Innovation Horizon I, R&D and PD driven by marketing High percentage used as fashion Seasonal change to 2 years < 2 years High Tech Marketing driven by I, R&D and PD As intended > 2 years > 5 years Rapid cycle of innovation in sports industry © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 28 ® Sports products vs. high tech industries Harmony between R&D and marketing Success Harmony Mild disharmony Severe disharmony 52% 32% 11% Partial Success 35% 45% 21% Failure 13% 23% 68% 1998 study: 53 firms, 289 new product development projects ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 29 The big idea Innovation and Creation ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Innovation process Reduce risk by staying on the curve Why didn’t we think of that before? Risk Innovation Design Manufacturing Development timeline ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 31 Catching the great ideas A great innovation starts with 1000 ideas • Create an idea portfolio Collecting ideas • Identification and tracking of lead-users • Identification of transferable technology in other industries • Open ended brainstorming – no constraints! Key point: • Don’t miss the great innovation by starting too narrow! Risk Reduce risk by staying on the curve Why didn’t we think of that before? Innovation Design Manufacturing Development timeline 32 ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 Product vs. job People don’t want a ” drill, they want a ” hole • Ted Levitt, Harvard • People buy products to do a job Job Functional Social Emotional Define the job not the product • Innovate a concept to complete the job • Disruptive innovations possible © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 33 ® Research Consumer research Traditional approach • Find a need and fill it Does not lead to disruptive products Relies on people knowing what they need Incremental innovation Lead user approach • Applicable for low tech products • Barrier for innovating in high-tech may be high ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 34 Human centric research Get out and experience the world • Anthropology + Sociology + Psychology Empathy inspiration • Get in the driver’s seat Study extreme users (lead users) • Look for duct tape solutions ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 35 Ideation – build to think Prototype early, prototype often # prototypes Inspire Prototype Evolve Project timeline Specs Specs Validate Prototype ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 36 Prototype guidelines Early prototypes are very cheap • Story boards, sketches, duct tape, Tinker Toys Not all prototypes are physical • Software simulations • Experiential simulations Prototypes need to provide tangible results • Need measurable response Too big, too small, too fast … Validate with consumer feedback • Feedback likely quite different for concept, prototype, and final product ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 37 Innovation environments Knowledge diffusion • Knowledge flows by collaborative relationships Outside of company boundaries Years after the network is formed • Inventors connected to colleagues outside firms No depth chart in a single company Capitalize on collaborative networks • Avoid ivory towers Let the innovators build and maintain network Local information gets stale Give your innovation team license to innovate • Free them from bottom line or deadline thinking Diversify your work force ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 38 Case Studies ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 39 Triathlon Shoe Design ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Triathlon Shoe Design Running Shoe for Triathlon • CSI proposed topic to New Balance Educational Initiatives • SB Thesis in Mechanical Engineering • Hand’s on product development process • Use results of product development research Defining the Need • Triathlon (swim-bike-run) demands lightning quick transitions between disciplines as well as sustained performance ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 41 Triathlon Shoe Design Methodology • Start with traditional product development process • Modify as required for niche market “User Centered” Product Development • Two rounds of consumer contact: Lead users - interviews Consumers - surveys • Gain in-depth perspective of the product needs and customer demographics Lead Users • Aid in identification of key product needs • Map these needs into surveys ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 42 Triathlon Shoe Design Survey • Modified sponsor proprietary survey Use lead user input 9 Questions on demographics 8 Sport specific 14 Shoe features • Apply survey design research Humans differentiate around five levels • Over 200 respondents Observation: Timing of survey distribution • Validate demographic data through sport research databases Sport Governing Bodies Manufacturer’s Association ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 43 Triathlon Shoe Design Weekly Training Hours Sample Survey Results 45% 30% 15% 0% <5 6-10 11-15 16+ • Demographic data: use for product needs • Use lead user input to interpret Rating Desired Features 10 8 6 4 2 0 results Note 10 point scale Tr an si tio So n ck s En W try ei g B ht re C at us h h St ion a D bili ur ty ab ili t Cy le an ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 44 Triathlon Shoe Design Results of Needs Survey 3 key features identified: • Rapid entry required Transition from the bike • Moisture/heat management is critical Higher need than running only • Interior design crucial Triathletes do not wear socks ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 45 Triathlon Shoe Design Concept Generation • Recent research has shown that solo brainstorming generates more ideas than group brainstorming Over 50 concepts for shoe fastening/closing Over 30 concepts for hand grips ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 46 Triathlon Shoe Design Prototype EZ-On Tri Shoe • Project start February 2001 • Thesis completed May 2001 ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 47 Triathlon Shoe Design New Balance 920 • Production prototype October 2001 • Product Release July 2002 ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 48 Ultra-marathon Shoe Design Building on success • Process repeated for ultra-trail shoe design • Key features Integrated gator to keep debris out of shoe Open mesh and drainage holes for water elimination Toe protection Firm bottom to protect from sharp rocks Varied tread design for varied trails ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 49 Triathlon Shoe Design ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 www.kokofitness.com Koko Fitness ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Current activities – mostly aerobic ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 52 What the consumer knows… Strength training • Can have a profound impact on a person's mental and emotional health Benefits of strength training • • • • • • • • • Arthritis relief Restoration of balance and Reduction of falls Strengthening of bone Weight maintenance Improved glucose control Healthy state of mind Sleep improvement Healthy heart tissue ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 53 What the consumer sees… ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 54 What the consumer sees… ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 55 Need: Smart strength training system Functional • Strength training capabilities • Efficient Short learning curve Short workout sessions • Easy to learn Structured approach Adaptability Social • Ability to share experience/results Emotional • Positive results for using system • Enjoy the experience • Reduce intimidation ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 56 Market analysis Market opportunity • Strength training participation exploding • Driven by new audience (boomers) • Current products Confusing, boring, time consuming, difficult to use/use correctly Customers • 28,000 U.S. health clubs • 10,000+ Hotels/resorts • 15,000+ PT clinics Strength training participation ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 57 The product A new product category • Interactive fitness Sports + Technology • Latest in strength training concepts • Smart application of technology New software platform • Delivers content directly to user • Turns activity into data User friendly design Customer/Consumer • Customer = health clubs, hotels, etc. • Consumer = end user ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 58 Koko Smartrainer ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 59 www.kokofitness.com Koko Fitness ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 A Better Baseball Experience ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Create A Better Baseball Experience Defining the Need • Baseball is rich in tradition but losing fans Challenge • Develop concepts that bring the physics of the game to life • Add to the viewer understanding and enjoyment of the game • Must be noninvasive to the sport as it is now played © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 62 ® Innovation Process Benchmarking current state • Broadcast chatter: less than 40% focused on the game • Noted existence of other technologies (K-Zone, etc.) Immersion • In-depth study of the game was conducted to identify any aspect of the game that can be measured, and potential implementations of the measurement • Over 15 broadcast concepts were derived Lead User Feedback • Ranked the concepts for implementation risk vs. audience impact Results • Four concepts were “re-broadcast” in a mock game segment • Video game footage was used for unavailable camera angles ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 63 Create A Better Baseball Experience ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 64 A Better Baseball Experience ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Cycling Time Trial Performance ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Quiz – Energy cost of drag Estimate the percentage of the cyclist’s energy used to overcome the air resistance at racing speed (48 kph or 30 mph). Assume the wind isn’t blowing. 0 – 25% 26 – 50% 51 – 75% 76 – 100% Viktor Rapinski, Team Saturn © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 67 ® Quiz – Energy cost of drag 0 – 25% 26 – 50% 51 – 75% X76 – 100% Aerodynamic Drag ~ 90%, ~ 2/3 is the rider! Rolling Resistance ~ 10% Drive Train Loss < 1% Viktor Rapinski, Team Saturn ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 68 Wright Brothers Memorial Wind Tunnel ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 69 WBWT test section ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 70 Cycling Time Trial Performance Bike Test Mount • Adjustable for wide range of bikes • Wide attachments • Driven front wheel • Rear wheel Driven Power controlled Test with or without rider ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 71 Operator interface ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 72 Rider feedback Slide back 2 cm on saddle ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 73 Cycling Time Trial Performance ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 74 Ivan Basso Cycling News: May 6, 2004 • Riis as told to the Danish media 3-4 seconds per kilometer 3 minutes in a 40-50 kilometer TT 2003 Final ITT • Basso 22nd place 2004 Final ITT • Basso 6th place • Time difference within 2% of predicted improvement 2005 • Dominated ITT events at 2005 Giro • 2nd overall at the Tour de France ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 75 Carlos Sastre Time in the tunnel • 3 hours Drag reduction • 17% Position changes • Saddle 2 cm forward and 1.5 cm up • Hands 1.5 cm forward on aerobars • Straight extensions parallel to ground plane ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 76 Alberto Contador Time in the tunnel • 1 hour Drag reduction • 5% (helmet, apparel) Position changes • Head angle Equipment • Aero helmet prototypes • Skinsuit prototypes ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 77 http://www.rbkedgeuniform.com/ Reebok ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Edge Hockey Uniform Managed performance test program • Uniform profile Body scan data • Aerodynamics Wind tunnel testing • Athlete testing Moisture absorption Thermal comfort • Thermal images • Skin surface temperature Reebok promotional video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDtJf7RFOGo ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 79 Edge Hockey Uniform ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 80 http://www.rbkedgeuniform.com/ Reebok ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 Fulcrum Skate Performance ® 6th International Conference on the Engineering of Sport Technical University of Munich Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 K. B. Blair, K. F. Culligan, D. Walfisch Background Long-track speed skaters use a hinged skate blade • Traditional klapskate – rotation only • Fulcrum skate – rotation and translation Blade contact time and biomechanics translate into speed ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 83 Experimental Description Skaters mimic skating motion in a lab setting ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 84 Video Processing Time 1 Hinge begins to open Time 2 Skate leaves wood block ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 85 Results • Mixed results on ankle flex • Increased maximum hinge angle • Increased ice contact time Skater # ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 86 Current work On ice testing ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 87 Fulcrum Skate Performance 6th International Conference on the Engineering of Sport ® Technical University of Munich K. B. Blair, K. F. Culligan, D. Walfisch Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 The End of the Internet. References ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 References Brown, T., “Innovation through design thinking,” MIT Sloan Dean’s Innovative Leader Series, http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/357/, March 16, 2006. Campbell, R.B., “Architecting and Innovating”, MIT Center for Innovation and Product Development, White Paper. Christensen, C.M., Cook, S., Hall, T., “Marketing Malpractice: The Case and the Cure,” Harvard Business Review, pp 74-83, December, 2005. Fleming, L., and Juda, A., “A Network of Invention,” Harvard Business Review, April 2004. Freedman, G., “Taming Innovation,” Darwin Magazine, http://www.darwinmag.com/. Giannakis, A., Stricker, C., Kotrotsios, G., “Strategy Deployment of High-Technology Companies Entering the Consumer Sports Electronic Market,” The Engineering of Sport 6, Vol. 3, pp 23-28, Springer, 2006. Hanna, R. K., Moritiz, E.F., “Sports Engineering and Sustainability,” The Engineering of Sport 6, Vol. 3, pp 47-52, Springer, 2006. Kuczmarski, T. D., “Obama Needs a Secretary of Innovation,” BusinessWeek, February 11, 2009. Leifer, R., McDermott, C.M., O'Connor, G.C., Peters, L.S., Rice, M.P., and Veryzer, R.W., and, Radical Innovation: How Mature Companies Can Outsmart Upstarts , Harvard, 2002. Seybold, P.B., Outside Innovation, Collins, 2006. Sorenson, O., and Fleming, L., “Science and the Diffusion of Knowledge,” Research Policy, Vol. 33, no. 10, pp. 1615-1634, December 2004. Souder, W. E., “Managing Relations Between R&D and Marketing in New Product Development,” Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol. 5, No.1, March 1988. Ulrich, K.T., Eppinger, S.D, Product Design and Development, McGraw-Hill, 2004. ® © sports innovation group LLC, 2009 90 Thank You! Thought leadership is appreciated! ® Kim B. Blair PHD Founder / President kbb@sportsinnovationgroup.com +1 781.266.6375 ...
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This note was uploaded on 07/09/2010 for the course ME ME553 taught by Professor Ramahni during the Spring '09 term at Purdue University Calumet.

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