Lecture_2_Plant_Life_Cycles

Lecture_2_Plant_Life_Cycles - Re w of Le vie cture1 1. Te...

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Review of Lecture 1 1. Terminology and definitions 2. From a single cell to a complex organism 3. Animal vs. plant development 4. Determinate vs. indeterminate development 5. Cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic information
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A B C Achieving non-equivalence?
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A B C Fate determination in animals
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A B C Fate determination in plants
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Development Mechanisms that regulate plant and animal development have important similarities. However, fundamental differences arose during evolution that reflect the different constraints imposed on each. From Meyerowitz, E. M. 1999. The logic of development. Trends in Genetics 15 : M65-M68.
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Sulston, J. E., Schierenberg, E., White, J. G. and Thomson, J. N. (1983). The embryonic cell lineage of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Develop. Biol., 100, 64 S 119. Lineage Caenorhabditis elegans
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Cell-intrinsic information Could arise from, 1. Cell’s individual history (age) 2. Inherited from its ancestors such as aspects of cellular composition like the cytoskeleton, nutrient status, or epigenetic changes in the cell’s DNA
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Cell-extrinsic information Could arise from, 1. The plant itself (the cell wall, cell-to-cell, organ to cell, physical forces within a tissue) 2. The environment (light, gravity, temperature etc.)
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Lecture 2 Outline Chapter 1 1. Alternation of generations 2. Angiosperm life cycle a) Gametophyte development b) Sporophyte development 3. Anatomy and Morphology
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Terminology 1. Gametophyte : consists of haploid (1n) cells (one of two multicellular forms of a plant) 2. S porophyte : consists of diploid (2n) cells (one of two 3. Alternation of generations : the alternation of sporophyte and gametophyte life-forms during sexual reproduction in all plants
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Moss Life Cycle Alternation of Generations 2n 1n Gametophyte is dominant From Nabors, M. 2004. “Introduction to Botany” Pearson Publishing. Size
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This note was uploaded on 07/10/2010 for the course BIOL 321 taught by Professor Susanlolle during the Winter '09 term at Waterloo.

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Lecture_2_Plant_Life_Cycles - Re w of Le vie cture1 1. Te...

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