Lecture_3_Meristems

Lecture_3_Meristems - ReviewofLecture2 Chapter1 1....

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Review of Lecture 2 Chapter 1 1. Alternation of generations 2. Angiosperm life cycle a) Gametophyte development b) Sporophyte development 3. Anatomy and Morphology
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Angiosperms   Alternation of generations  2n 1n 1. Sporophyte is the  diploid phase 2. Gametophyte is  haploid phase . 3. The sporophyte is recognizable to us as the  plant. 4. Pollen is the male gametophyte while the  ovule contains the female gametophyte.   Flowering Plants
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Male Gametophyte From Raven Evert and Eichhorn,2005. “Biology of Plants” Sixth Edition, Freeman and Company Publishers
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Female Gametophyte From Raven Evert and Eichhorn, 2005. “Biology of Plants” Sixth Edition, Freeman and Company Publishers
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Fern vs. Angiosperm gametophytes Multicellular and independent Multicellular and dependent
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Angiosperm Life Cycle II. Sporophyte development (Lab #1) Germination and seedling development Juvenile Phase Vegetative phase  prior to sexual  maturity.
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Angiosperm Life Cycle III. Sporophyte development (Lab #1) Adult Phase Vegetative and  reproductive  development. In an  annual, this phase is determinate and in a  perennial is  indeterminate.
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The Primary Root In longitudinal and cross-section
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The Primary Shoot 1. Shoot consist of leaf or bud  bearing  nodes  separated by  leafless  internodes 2. The shoot apical meristem  (SAM) is at the very tip and  usually consists of cells  apical to the youngest leaf  primordium SAM
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Lecture 3 Outline 1. Apical Meristems 2. Spatial Relationships 3. Lineage Relationships  4. Patterns of organ initiation a) Vegetative b) Reproductive
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Apical Meristems 1. Meristems are formed during embryogenesis. 2. Found at the growing tips of the shoot and root (SAM and  RAM, respectively) 3. Give rise to primary tissues.  4. Are a made up of pool of ‘undifferentiated’ cells (“initials”)  that divide to give rise daughter cells.  5. Daughter cells become either derivatives or remain ‘initials’  (cells make up the meristem proper).  
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Apical Meristems Form During Embryogenesis Embryo development does not  require the formation of apical meristems
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This note was uploaded on 07/10/2010 for the course BIOL 321 taught by Professor Susanlolle during the Winter '09 term at Waterloo.

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Lecture_3_Meristems - ReviewofLecture2 Chapter1 1....

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