Lecture_4_Apoplast-Symplast

Lecture_4_Apoplast-Symplast - ReviewofLecture3 1. 2. 3. 4....

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Review of Lecture 3 1. Apical Meristems 2. Spatial Relationships 3. Lineage Relationships  4. Patterns of organ initiation a) Vegetative b) Reproductive
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Root Growth 1. The supply of dividing cells are found  at the tip of the root in a region is  known as the  root apical meristem   (“fountain of youth”) 2. The root apical m eristem  consists  of a group of ‘initials’ or dividing  cells 3. These cells reside within the  quiescent centre’
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Tunica-Corpus Organization From Raven, Evert and Eichhorn. 2005, Biology of Plants . Chap.26
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Lineage Structure 1. The L1 typically gives rise to the  epidermis and is the most ‘stable’ layer. 2. L2 and L3 give rise to the subepidermal  tissues such as the leaf mesophyll and the  vascular tissue. 3. Cells from one layer can invade other  layers although these events tend to be  directionally biased. L1 L2 L3 SAM
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Patterns of Initiation Phyllotaxy  or leaf  order is determined  when leaves  initiate. What determines these  patterns? Nabors, M. 2004. Introduction to Botany
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What else influences phyllotaxy? Developmental phase 1. Juvenile to adult phase transitions often affect  phyllotaxy 2. Determinate to indeterminate transitions also manifest  changes in phyllotaxy (vegetative to reproductive  transitions) 3. Vegetative SAMs differ morphologically from  reproductive SAMs (inflorescence and floral meristems)
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Floral Transition Upon transition to flowering, the SAM undergoes changes in size and organization  as well as shows a marked increase in cell division.    SEM of Arabidopsis inflorescence  meristem (m) showing a floral bud (fb)  with emergent sepal primordia.   Phyllotaxy changes from spiral to  whorled.
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Floral Organs are Modified Leaves 1. Most floral forms evolved from radially  symmetric flowers containing 4 whorls of organs 2. The two outermost whorls are sterile consisting  of the sepals the petals 3. The inner two whorls give rise to the male and  female gametophytes (the stamens and carpels)
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The Arabidopsis Flower From Raven, Evert and Eichhorn. 2005, Biology of Plants . Chap.26
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Lecture 4 Outline  1. Communication Networks 2. Apoplastic and Symplastic domains 3. Plant Cells and Cell Walls 4. Plasmodesmata 5. Implications for intercellular signaling  (NCAMs)
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5 :712-726. Biological Evolution of 
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Lecture_4_Apoplast-Symplast - ReviewofLecture3 1. 2. 3. 4....

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