A Comparison of the Status of Women in Classical Athens and E

A Comparison of the Status of Women in Classical Athens and E

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A Comparison of the Status of Women in Classical Athens and Early Christianity A Since the beginning of time the treatment of women has improved dramatically. In the earliest of times women were mere slaves to men. Today women are near equals in almost all fields. In 411 B.C., when Lysistrata was written, men had many stunning advantages to that of their female counterparts. Although women's rights between 30 and 100 A.D., the time of the New Testament, were still not what they are today, the treatment of women was far better. Overall, the equality of women in the New Testament exceeds that of the women in Lysistrata in three major ways: physical mobility, society's view of women's nature, and women's public legal rights. Albeit in Lysistrata the women were shown as revolutionaries rising up against the men, women in classical Greece were never like that. Aristophanes created the play as a comedy, showing how the world might be in the times of the Peloponesian war if women tried to do something. It was the women's job to stay
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This note was uploaded on 07/11/2010 for the course LAW non taught by Professor Non during the Spring '10 term at Alfred State College.

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A Comparison of the Status of Women in Classical Athens and E

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