PSY 100 STRAYER UNIVERSITY

PSY 100 STRAYER UNIVERSITY -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lesson: Learning with Change and Experience and Memory
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Page Title: Lesson Introduction Page Number: 1 To get where you are today, you had to learn a lot of information. In order to use that information,  you had to remember it.  In this lesson, we will analyze the underlying principles and basis of psychology behind learning  and memory. 
Background image of page 2
Page Title: Lesson Objectives Page Number: 2 At the end of this lesson, you should be able to: Define classical conditioning Describe the nature, principles, the process and neural basis of classical  conditioning Define operant conditioning Describe the nature, principles, the process and neural basis of operant  conditioning Define observational learning Describe the nature, principles, the process and neural basis of behavioral  learning Define memory and the different types of memory Discuss the role of the different memory systems Identify the methods of construction of schemas and their use Discuss forgetting and some of the views related to it  Page Title: Menu Page Page Number: 3 This lesson presents the following topics: Learning  Classical Conditioning Operant Conditioning Cognitive Learning Theory Observational Learning Memory Page Title: Learning Page Number: 4 Everything you do, you learned from someone, someplace, or somehow. From tying your shoes  to using a computer, you learn how to do things. Learning  is any relatively permanent change in behavior brought about by an experience or  practice. Although psychologists still debate this, many believe that once you learn something, it  is always present somewhere in your memory.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Page Title: Classical Conditioning Page Number: 5 Have you heard of Pavlov’s dogs? Most people have. Ivan Pavlov was a Russian physiologist who  stumbled on classical conditioning, which is learning to make a reflex response to a stimulus that  is different than the original, natural stimulus that normally produces the reflex.  In classical conditioning, several elements must be present and experienced for conditioning to  take place: Unconditioned stimulus (UCS.)  is a naturally occurring stimulus that leads to an  involuntary response. Unconditioned response (UCR.)  is an involuntary response to a naturally  occurring or unconditioned stimulus. Neural stimulus (NS)  is stimulus that has no effect on the desired response.  Conditioned stimulus (CS)  is a stimulus that becomes able to produces a  learned reflex response by being paired with the original, unconditioned stimulus.
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/15/2010 for the course PSY PSY 100 taught by Professor Laurahoffman during the Spring '10 term at Strayer.

Page1 / 17

PSY 100 STRAYER UNIVERSITY -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online