Now if you gentlemen will leave us for a few minutes

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Unformatted text preview: d, primarily in the direction of Sprawling, who was trying vainly to relax in a flimsy wooden chair. Sprawling was only one level down from the Attorney General himself, and this placed him several levels above Mast. He would listen politely for a few minutes to the opinions of the underlings, then he and Jaynes would make the decision. Hamilton Jaynes looked at T.L. Parrish, and asked, "Are you reasonably confident you can convict Lani-gan of murder?" T.L. was a cautious type, and he knew full well any promises made to this group would be long remembered. "Murder might have some problems. Manslaughter is a lock." "How much time on a manslaughter?" "Twenty years." "How much would he serve?" "Five, more or less." Generated by ABC Amber LIT Converter, http://www.processtext.com/abclit.html Oddly, this seemed to please Jaynes, a career man who thought trespassers should serve time. "You agree, Cutter?" he asked, pacing along the edge of the bed. "There's not much evidence," Cutter said. "We can't prove who, how, what, when, or where as far as the murder goes. We think we know why, but the trial could be a nightmare. Manslaughter is much easier." Jaynes asked Parrish, "How about the Judge? Will he sentence him to the maximum?" "If convicted of manslaughter, I would expect the Judge to sentence him to twenty years. Parole is determined by the prison authorities." "Can we safely assume that Lanigan will spend the next five years behind bars?" Jaynes asked, looking around the room. "Yes, certainly," said Parrish defensively. "And we're not backing off the capital murder. We intend to make a strong argument that Lanigan killed another person so he could steal the money. The death penalty is a longshot, but if he's convicted of simple murder, he could face life in prison." "Does it really make any difference to us whether he spends time at P...
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This note was uploaded on 07/18/2010 for the course LIT 301 taught by Professor Dra during the Spring '10 term at American College of Computer & Information Sciences.

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