The fire department which of course was on the white

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Unformatted text preview: y Rex, were enjoying this quick butchering of someone who'd meddled in legal affairs and gotten it all wrong. Even Mr. Gaddis seemed content to let me bleed. Lucien was wise enough to stop when the blood was flowing. He growled something like, "I'm through with him." Mr. Gaddis had no questions. The bailiff motioned for me to step down, off the witness chair, and I tried desperately to walk upright back to the bench where Baggy was still hunkering down, like a stray dog in a hailstorm. I scribbled notes through the rest of the hearing, but it was a failing effort to look busy and important. I could feel the stares. I was humiliated and wanted to lock myself in my office for a few days. Wilbanks ended things with an impassioned plea to move the case somewhere far away, maybe even the Gulf Coast, where perhaps a few folks had heard of the crime but no one had been "poisoned" by the Times's coverage of it. He railed against me and my newspaper, and he went overboard. Mr. Gaddis, in Generated by ABC Amber LIT Converter, http://www.processtext.com/abclit.html his closing remarks, reminded the Judge of the old saying, "Strong and bitter words indicate a weak cause." I wrote that down. Then I hustled out of the courtroom as if I had an important deadline. Chapter Eleven Baggy rushed into my office late the following morning with the hot news that Lucien Wilbanks had just withdrawn his motion to change venue. As usual, he was full of analysis. His first windy opinion was that the Padgitts didn't want the trial moved to another county. They knew Danny was dead guilty and that he would almost certainly be convicted by a properly selected jury anywhere. Their sole chance was to get a jury they could either buy or intimidate. Since all guilty verdicts must be unanimous, they needed only a single vote in Danny's favor. Just one vote and the jury would hang itself; the Judge would be required by law to declare a mistrial. It would certainly be retried, but with the same result. After three or fou...
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