Chapter 2 %26 3 (HW1) solutions

Chapter 2 %26 3 (HW1) solutions - Solutions for Homework...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2.11 (a) Briefly cite the main differences between ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding. Solution (a) The main differences between the various forms of primary bonding are: Ionic --there is electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions. Covalent --there is electron sharing between two adjacent atoms such that each atom assumes a stable electron configuration. Metallic --the positively charged ion cores are shielded from one another, and also "glued" together by the sea of valence electrons. 2.12 Compute the percentage ionic character of the interatomic bond for each of the following compounds: MgO and CdS. Solution The percent ionic character is a function of the electron negativities of the ions X A and X B according to Equation 2.10. The electronegativities of the elements are found in Figure 2.7. For MgO, X Mg = 1.2 and X O = 3.5, and therefore, % IC = 1 - e ( - 0 . 25 )( 3 . 5 - 1 . 2 ) 2 × 100 = 73.4% For CdS, X Cd = 1.7 and X S = 2.5, and therefore, %IC = 1 - e ( - 0 . 25 )( 2 . 5 - 1 . 7 ) 2 × 100 = 14.8%
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2.13 Using Table 2.2, determine the number of covalent bonds that are possible for atoms of the following elements: silicon, nitrogen, and neon. Solution For silicon, having the valence electron structure 3 s 2 3 p 2 , N' = 4; thus, there are 8 – N' = 4 covalent bonds per atom. For nitrogen, having the valence electron structure 2 s 2 2 p 3 , N' = 5; thus, there are 8 – N' = 3 covalent bonds per atom. For neon, having the valence electron structure 2 s 2 2 p 6 , N’ = 8; thus, there are 8 – N' = 0 covalent bonds per atom, which is what we would expect since neon is an inert gas. 2.14) What type(s) of bonding would be expected for each of the following materials: solid  xenon, bronze, and rubber? Solid Xenon: Van der Waals - Xenon is an inert gas that has a full outer shell so that no electrons can take part in  primary bonding. Xenon has no permanent dipoles and there is no hydrogen so the  only bonding available is Van der Waals Bronze: Metallic  - Bronze is a metallic alloy and therefore would be held together by metallic bonding  between all atoms. Rubber: Covalent, Van der Waals and Hydrogen
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/19/2010 for the course EMA 3010 taught by Professor Unknown during the Summer '08 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 12

Chapter 2 %26 3 (HW1) solutions - Solutions for Homework...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online