A Framework for Thinking Ethically

A Framework for Thinking Ethically

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Unformatted text preview: e
types
of
problems
we
 face.
 
 • Ethics
is
not
following
the
law.
A
good
system
of
law
does
incorporate
many
ethical
standards,
but
 law
can
deviate
from
what
is
ethical.
Law
can
become
ethically
corrupt,
as
some
totalitarian
 regimes
have
made
it.
Law
can
be
a
function
of
power
alone
and
designed
to
serve
the
interests
of
 narrow
groups.
Law
may
have
a
difficult
time
designing
or
enforcing
standards
in
some
important
 areas,
and
may
be
slow
to
address
new
problems.
 
 • Ethics
is
not
following
culturally
accepted
norms.
Some
cultures
are
quite
ethical,
but
others
 become
corrupt
‐or
blind
to
certain
ethical
concerns
(as
the
United
States
was
to
slavery
before
...
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This note was uploaded on 07/20/2010 for the course SOC 308 taught by Professor Kurtz during the Summer '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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