chat - • ERECKSON BRIGGS HILLIS (Sep 9, 2009 3:18 PM PDT)...

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Unformatted text preview: • ERECKSON BRIGGS HILLIS (Sep 9, 2009 3:18 PM PDT) hello world • STEVEN LY (Sep 9, 2009 9:53 PM PDT) howdy • MICHAEL ZHUANG LI (Sep 10, 2009 10:23 AM PDT) World has been quiet • ALEXANDRA GRYSHKO (Sep 10, 2009 10:36 AM PDT) How is everyone doing? • STEVEN LY (Sep 10, 2009 3:04 PM PDT) Not too bad, this semester isn't as awful as I had predicted (but the future is always full of surprises). How's about you? • JANET M LEE (Sep 16, 2009 2:56 PM PDT) anyone know when the assignment answers will be posted? • FRANCESCA TAN CHUA (Sep 17, 2009 9:52 AM PDT) they're up now. • JUDITH VIGUILLA BORCELIS (Sep 18, 2009 6:41 PM PDT) Can anyone clarify what question 4 means for Assignment 3? The question states: What happens when you are studying an asexual species? What exactly are they referring to when they say "what happens"? How do they what us to answer this question, I mean, "what happens" in terms of what? • JANET M LEE (Sep 20, 2009 10:15 AM PDT) I was assuming it was the r- value. What happens to the r-value when studying an asexual reproducing species? • JUDITH VIGUILLA BORCELIS (Sep 20, 2009 12:31 PM PDT) Oh, ok. Thank you. • MICHAEL JAMES LOUGH STEVENS (Sep 20, 2009 2:46 PM PDT) I'm having trouble thinking about the variation for sexually monogamous couples from the assignment. There seem to be so many possible variables, so how do you decide on the the median and the variation? • SORREN DEANNA LINDSTROM (Sep 20, 2009 3:13 PM PDT) I think the idea is a bit more general. That is to say, it's likening the RS of sexually monogamous males to that of females in the Bateman graph. In the Bateman graph, because females are limited by the # of eggs they can produce, their variance is low (they don't mate with many males). Likewise, in sexually monogamous males, their variance is low because they don't mate with many females. On the Bateman graph, we generalized how much "smaller" the female vs. male variance was, so on this graph, I made a similar ratio. • SORREN DEANNA LINDSTROM (Sep 20, 2009 3:15 PM PDT) Well, not the Bateman graph, actually. The graph right after the Bateman graph - whichever guy came up with that one! • MICHAEL JAMES LOUGH STEVENS (Sep 20, 2009 3:40 PM PDT) So, you're saying it's maybe a mean slightly further to the right than the polygynous males and a smaller variation? I can't seem to think of a suitable alternative • MICHAEL JAMES LOUGH STEVENS (Sep 20, 2009 3:53 PM PDT) btw, thanks for talking about the RS from the point of view of the Bateman graph, very useful, thanks • SORREN DEANNA LINDSTROM (Sep 20, 2009 3:59 PM PDT) Yes, exactly what I was getting at. At least, that's what I got from it. That could be wrong....
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This note was uploaded on 07/23/2010 for the course IB Animal Beh taught by Professor Lacey during the Spring '09 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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chat - • ERECKSON BRIGGS HILLIS (Sep 9, 2009 3:18 PM PDT)...

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