Ch 8 - Ch 8. The Special Senses 10/1 & 3/08 I....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ch 8. The Special Senses I. Classification of Sensory Receptors II. Ears, Hearing, and Equilibrium I. Eyes and Vision
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Special Senses Tell Us about Our Environment
Background image of page 2
Smelling and tasting are chemical senses • Olfaction (sense of smell) occurs in the upper chambers of the nasal passages. • Olfactory cells extend from the olfactory bulb through the cribriform plate of the ethmoid and into the mucus lining of the nasal cavity. • Each cell is a modified neuron that ends in five olfactory cilia, which bear specific olfactory receptors. • When the receptors bind their specific odor molecule, an impulse is sent to the brain for interpretation. 8-3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
library.thinkquest.org/. ../smell/funtosmell.htm We can detect over 1,000 odorant chemicals
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
• Gustation (sense of taste) is closely allied with olfaction. • In the mouth, food is mechanically and chemically broken down. • Taste buds in the lining of the mouth and on the surface of the tongue allow us to distinguish four categories of taste: – Sweet, sour, salty or bitter • When stimulated, taste buds send information to the brain to be analyzed. 8-4
Background image of page 6
8-5 Figure 8.1 Taste bud anatomy
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Referred Pain
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Stretch Receptors : Muscle spindle
Background image of page 10
II. Ears, Hearing, and Equilibrium Frequency : cycle/sec, or Hertz (Hz), we can detect 20 Hz-20 KHz Amplitude (intensity): decibel (db), we can detect 0-120 db
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Hearing and balance are detected by mechanoreceptors The ear houses our sense of hearing. It has three functional parts: Outer Composed of pinna and auditory canal (capture sound waves and funnel them to middle ear) Middle The tympanic membrane (ear drum) Inner 8-8
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8-10 Figure 8.4 The inner parts of the ear
Background image of page 14
Middle ear Compression waves in the air (sound) cause the tympanic membrane to vibrate. The membrane is attached to the malleus
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/25/2010 for the course BISC 104LXG at USC.

Page1 / 41

Ch 8 - Ch 8. The Special Senses 10/1 & 3/08 I....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online