M Long - SOC 315 Final Paper - notes

M Long - SOC 315 Final Paper - notes - 1 Ending Child Labor...

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1 Ending Child Labor in the Developing World Maggie Long Leon Ragosi SOC 315-41 Sociology of Work California State University Dominguez Hills June 28, 2010
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Long 2 Child labor has existed in some form throughout most of history. According to economist Milton Friedman, almost all children worked in agriculture prior to the late nineteenth century. During the Industrial Revolution, many of these children moved from farm work to factory work. The dangerous conditions faced by children in factories, in combination with the advent of universal schooling and workers’ rights movement, helped establish the practice as less acceptable (Child Labor, 2010). Although attempts to outlaw child labor in the United States began as early as 1852, no permanent Federal legislation limited its practice until the passage of the Fair Labor Standards Act in 1938 which placed restrictions on the employment of children under age 18 (Child Labor Laws in the United States, 2010). Since then, the International Labor Organization (ILO) has sought to implement global standards. Despite their efforts, child labor persists and is especially common in developing countries (One World, 2009). There are an estimated 218 million children working worldwide and almost all live in developing countries. While most toil in agriculture, some may work in domestic service, factory production and backstreet workshops. The ILO estimates that as many as 10 million children may endure the worst forms including prostitution, military enrollment and slavery (One World, 2009). Possible Solutions Consumer Action Legal Action The Economic Excuse
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Long 3 Proposed Education Solution Conclusion Notes (Child Labor, 2010). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_labour . As long as there is family poverty there will be child labour. Over time, as real wages rose, parents became able to afford to send their children to school instead of work and as a result child labour declined, both before and after legislation This minimum age depends on the country and the type of work involved. States ratifying the Minimum Age Convention adopted by the International Labour Organization in 1973, have adopted minimum ages varying from 14 to 16. Child labor laws in the United States set the minimum age to work in an establishment without restrictions and without parents' consent at age 16.[3] The incidence of child labour in the world decreased from 25 to 10 percent between 1960 and 2003, according to the World Bank. http://uk.oneworld.net/guides/childlabour
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Long 4 One World. (2009, November). Child Labour Guide. One World Guides . Retrieved from http://uk.oneworld.net/guides/childlabour . There are 218 million children working illegally in the eyes of international treaties. Child labour is defined as all economic activity for children under 12 years, any work for
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This note was uploaded on 07/24/2010 for the course SOC 315 taught by Professor Ragonesi during the Spring '10 term at CSU Dominguez Hills.

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M Long - SOC 315 Final Paper - notes - 1 Ending Child Labor...

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