Student%20Lecture%20%20Civil%20Liberties

Student Lecture - Lecture:CivilLiberties ,protectedbylaw, .

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture: Civil Liberties Civil liberties  are freedoms, protected by law, to act or not to act and to be free from  unwarranted governmental intrusion in one’s life.  Primarily these liberties are protected  by the first ten amendments. Personal rights and freedoms that the federal government cannot abridge by law,  constitution, or judicial interpretation.  Freedom from. Civil rights  encompass participation in society on an equal footing with others.   Mostly  draws from newer amendments that were not included in the first ten.   In other words, civil rights protect individuals from acts of discrimination, humiliation,  attacks on dignity, and a person’s personal emotions.   Creates a system of equality. Focuses a lot on group rights, homosexuals, blacks, and women.   The first ten amendments are particular rights granted to the people.   These rights were very important to the founders and they believed the freedoms must  specifically be mentioned as protected rights and liberties.   They are not meant to be all-inclusive.  
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
In other words, just because other rights are not listed in the Bill of Rights does not mean  they do not exist.   Amendment IX  of the Bill of Rights guarantees this.   It   states   that   the   rights   of   the   people   are   not   limited   to   those   spelled   out   in   the  Constitution If you look closely at the Bill of Rights, you’ll see that most of the limitations on  government action are directed toward Congress. For   instance,   the   First   Amendment   states   that   “Congress   shall   make   no   law……” This wording allows some to argue that the Bill of Rights only affects the US Congress,  and does not apply to the states. In fact, until around 1900, the Supreme Court clearly stipulated that the Bill of Rights  applied only to the national government.   States argued that these rights only apply to the national government and therefore,  cannot be applied in states.   This was argued as a protection of state rights. Barron v. Baltimore (1833):  Supreme Court ruled that the federal Bill of Rights applied  only to the national government. 2
Background image of page 2
In 1868, the  Fourteenth Amendment  was added to the US Constitution and its language  suggested the possibility that the rights applied to the national government must also  apply to state government. Due process clause
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/24/2010 for the course POLS POLS 1101 taught by Professor Albert during the Summer '10 term at Augusta University.

Page1 / 23

Student Lecture - Lecture:CivilLiberties ,protectedbylaw, .

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online