Judicial%20Branch%20Part%20I

Judicial%20Branch%20Part%20I - TheJudicialBranch

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Judicial Branch Courts : institutions that sit as neutral third parties to resolve conflicts according to the  law. Civil tradition : a legal system based on a detailed comprehensive legal code, usually  created by the legislature.    Only Louisiana has this here.   Based on French.   Leaves little discretion to judges in determining what the law is.   Little room for interpretation.   The judge’s job is to take an active role in getting at the truth.   He or she investigates the facts, asks questions, and determines what has happened.   There are few procedural protections for trial participants, like rights of the accused, for  instance.   The emphasis is more on getting the appropriate outcome than on maintaining the  integrity of the procedures.   The US system is different in three ways. 1.  US based on  common law tradition  rather than civil tradition.  
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A legal system based on the accumulated rulings of judges over time, applied  uniformly: Judge-made law.   The emphasis is on preserving the decision that has been made before, which is called  relying on  precedent , or  stare decisis . The US is not a pure common law system.   Legislatures do make laws, and attempts have been made to codify, or organize theme  into a coherent body of law.   Americans are less concerned with creating such a coherent body of law than with  responding to the various needs and demands of their constituents.   As a result, American laws have a somewhat haphazard and hodgepodge character.   But the common law nature of the legal system is reinforced by the fact that American  judges still use their considerable discretion to decide what the laws mean, and they rely  heavily on precedent and stare decisis.   Thus, when a judge decides a case, he or she will look at the relevant law but will also  consult previous rulings on the issue before making a ruling. 2.  The US is an  adversarial system .     Trial procedures designed to resolve conflict through the clash of opposing sides,  moderated by a neutral, passive judge who applies the law. 2
Background image of page 2
Other legal systems offer alternatives such as the  inquisitorial system . Trial procedures designed to determine the truth thorough the intervention of an active  judge who seeks evidence and questions witnesses.   3. The US is a  Litigious System . American citizens sue one another, or litigate, a lot.  There are more layers per 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/24/2010 for the course POLS POLS 1101 taught by Professor Albert during the Summer '10 term at Augusta University.

Page1 / 12

Judicial%20Branch%20Part%20I - TheJudicialBranch

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online