07 - Hobbes 10/31/07 ThomasHobbes (15881679)...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hobbes 31/10/2007 11:44:00 10/31/07 Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) Disorder raises questions of liberation, raises questions of how best to recreate  that which is lost something stable and secure Hobbs is instrumental in the idea of the modern state He borrows from the tradition of covenant and kingship Attended oxford university which was a very puritan environment- college  caused him to be interested in physical sciences Became a tutor to William Cavendish who was the second earl of Devonshire o Common practice among college graduates o Lived with Cavendish family Traveled in Europe o Met Galileo there o Appreciates geometry after he meets him (Euclidean geometry) In 1640 he turned his attention to politics and the English civil war Published obscure work  The Elements of Law  that got him in trouble o Hobbs argues for absolute power in the monarchy o He says there is nothing to the notion of divine right
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
o Royalists were not happy about these things o Unpopular with revolutionaries as well o Flees to Paris, remains in exile for awhile Here he writes  Leviathan  (1651), biblical reference Even more blunt defense of absolutism Able to return to England in 1652 Had been tutor to prince of Wales, who would be Charles  II when monarchy was restored Hobbs stays in England rest of his life Anti-clerical; hated Catholics, Presbyterians, and all sermons no matter who  gave them Eccentric; thought old men died by drowning in their own moisture, so he  attempted to sweat as much as he could Had a very small library I. Cosmology Asks the question is there anything permanent? Hobbs’ answer is yes.  There is something fundamental to the universe:  motion. Sets himself to the task of explaining the laws of motion, mechanical and  political. Only things can move, all of existence is matter and motion Even thought is matter, and all matter is in motion II. Animals Vital motion o Our pulse and breathing
Background image of page 2
Voluntary motion o Speech o Walking o All of the things we choose to do o Key ingredient in description: our PASSIONS 2 great sets of desires passion for something= desires passion against something= aversion We live in a world of moral chaos; we cannot be expected to cooperate in  serving any particular good.   The only answer we can give is the answer Hobbs gives.  Argument 1 Only way we can establish some tolerable harmony is to create some  external force.  Hobbs establishes need for it. Rejected the notion of free will.  We cannot chooses or desires and we need 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/26/2010 for the course POLI POLI 1001 taught by Professor Eubanks during the Fall '07 term at LSU.

Page1 / 22

07 - Hobbes 10/31/07 ThomasHobbes (15881679)...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online