Irish Americans were exposed to a dual labor market

Irish Americans were exposed to a dual labor market -...

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Approximately 50,000 to 100,000 Irishmen, over 75% of them Catholic, came to America in the 1600s, while 100,000 more Irish Catholics arrived in the 1700s (Immigration, 2002). During the late 1800s, occurs the first large Irish immigration came into America. The Irish immigrated to many countries during the famine. America was a popular country because it had not fully been discovered and people saw it as a land of opportunity. In addition, they were only going to perish slowly if they stayed in Ireland. The Irish abandoned a country life lacking modern industry to travel to America where they thought there would be better opportunities. Many of the Irish realized they were dumfounded for the enterprise pertaining to the metropolitan core in the United States. Irish immigrants were not the poorest people from their country. By American measures, the Irish were considered poor. Irish immigrants frequently started working at the bottom of the ladder. Many Irish immigrants could only find jobs that were in the category of servants and hazardous jobs. Other workers did not want these jobs, so they were readily available. Irish women filled many of the servant jobs, while the Irish men filled the
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This note was uploaded on 07/29/2010 for the course ETH 125 ETH125 taught by Professor Dan during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Irish Americans were exposed to a dual labor market -...

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