Principles of Economics- Mankiw (5th) 64

Principles of Economics- Mankiw (5th) 64 - 68 PA R T T W O...

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68 PART TWO SUPPLY AND DEMAND I: HOW MARKETS WORK Price If the price of ice cream rose to $20 per scoop, you would buy less ice cream. You might buy frozen yogurt instead. If the price of ice cream fell to $0.20 per scoop, you would buy more. Because the quantity demanded falls as the price rises and rises as the price falls, we say that the quantity demanded is negatively re- lated to the price. This relationship between price and quantity demanded is true for most goods in the economy and, in fact, is so pervasive that economists call it the law of demand: Other things equal, when the price of a good rises, the quan- tity demanded of the good falls. Income What would happen to your demand for ice cream if you lost your job one summer? Most likely, it would fall. A lower income means that you have less to spend in total, so you would have to spend less on some—and probably most— goods. If the demand for a good falls when income falls, the good is called a normal good. Not all goods are normal goods. If the demand for a good rises when income
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This note was uploaded on 07/30/2010 for the course ECON 120 taught by Professor Abijian during the Spring '10 term at Mesa CC.

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