Final Exam PowerPoint Binder

Final Exam PowerPoint Binder - Goals of Document Design to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Goals of Document Design to make a good impression on readers to emphasize the structure and hierarchy of the info to help readers find the information they need to help readers understand the information to help readers remember the information
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Four Principles of Design proximity alignment repetition contrast
Background image of page 2
Designing to Suit Cultural Preferences paper sizes typeface preferences color preferences text direction
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Determining Your Resources Time . What is your schedule? Money. Can you afford professional designers and print shops? Equipment . Complex designs require graphics software and desktop-publishing programs.
Background image of page 4
Elements to Consider in Designing the Document size (page size and page count) paper binding accessing tools
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Common Types of Bindings loose-leaf binders ring or spiral binders saddle binding perfect binding
Background image of page 6
Typical Accessing Aids 1. icons 2. color 3. dividers and tabs 4. cross-reference tables 5. headers and footers 6. page numbering
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Understanding Learning Theory and Page Design chunking queuing filtering Filtering with box and icon
Background image of page 8
Main Purposes of Margins They limit the amount of information on the page, making it easier to read and use. They provide space for binding and allow readers to hold the page without covering up the text. They provide a neat frame around the type. They provide space for marginal glosses.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Advantages of a Multicolumn Design Text is easier to read because the lines are shorter. Columns allow you to fit more information on the page. Columns let you use the principle of repetition to create a visual pattern.
Background image of page 10
Typography Typefaces, families, case, sizes Line spacing, line length Justification--spacing between the words--SLOWS down readers.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Serif and Sans-Serif Typefaces N N serif sans-serif
Background image of page 12
Type Families Part of the Helvetica family of type: Helvetica Helvetica Bold Helvetica Bold Italic Helvetica Narrow Helvetica Narrow Bold Helvetica Narrow Bold Italic
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Case Lowercase letters are easier to read: Individual variations are greater in lowercase words THAN THEY ARE IN UPPERCASE WORDS.
Background image of page 14
Examples of Effective Type Sizes footnotes 8- or 9-point type body text 10-, 11-, or 12-point headings 2 to 4 points larger than body text indexes 2 points smaller than body text titles 18 or 24 points slides 24- to 36-point type
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Use Line Spacing Carefully in Designing Headings Summary In this example, the writer has skipped a line between the heading and the text that follows it. Summary In this example, the writer has not skipped a line. The heading stands out, but not as emphatically. Summary. This run-in style makes the heading stand out the least.
Background image of page 16
Other Design Features rules boxes screens marginal glosses pull quotes
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 12 Creating Graphics 2007 Bedford/St. Martins 1 Functions of Graphics They can catch the reader's attention and interest. They can help you communicate information that is
Background image of page 18
Image of page 19
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/30/2010 for the course COM 2610 taught by Professor O'donnell during the Summer '10 term at Metropolitan State College of Denver.

Page1 / 178

Final Exam PowerPoint Binder - Goals of Document Design to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 19. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online