Chapter10

Chapter10 - Chapter 10 Analog Systems Microelectronic...

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Jaeger/Blalock 6/15/07 Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3E McGraw-Hill Chapter 10 Analog Systems Microelectronic Circuit Design Richard C. Jaeger Travis N. Blalock Chap10 - 1
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Jaeger/Blalock 6/15/07 Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3E McGraw-Hill Chapter Goals Develop understanding of linear amplification concepts such as: – Voltage gain, current gain, and power gain – Gain conversion to decibel representation – Input and output resistances – Transfer functions and Bode plots – Cutoff frequencies and bandwidth – Low-pass, high-pass, band-pass, and band-reject amplifiers – Biasing for linear amplification – Distortion in amplifiers – Two-port representations of amplifiers – Use of transfer function analysis in SPICE Chap10 - 2
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Jaeger/Blalock 6/15/07 Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3E McGraw-Hill Example of Analog Electronic System: FM Stereo Receiver Linear functions: Radio and audio frequency amplification, frequency selection (tuning), impedance matching (75- Ω input, tailoring audio frequency response, local oscillator Nonlinear functions: DC power supply(rectification), frequency conversion (mixing), detection/demodulation Chap10 - 3
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Jaeger/Blalock 6/15/07 Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3E McGraw-Hill Amplification: Introduction A complex periodic signal can be represented as the sum of many individual sine waves. We consider only one component with amplitude V s = 1 mV and frequency ω s with 0 phase (signal is used as reference): Amplifier output is sinusoidal with same frequency but different amplitude V O and phase θ : v s = V s sin s t v o = V o (sin s t + θ ) Chap10 - 4
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Jaeger/Blalock 6/15/07 Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3E McGraw-Hill Amplification: Introduction (cont.) Amplifier output power is: Here, P O = 100 W and R L = 8 Ω Output power also requires output current which is: Input current is given by phase is zero because circuit is purely resistive. P O = V o Λ Ν Μ Μ Μ Ξ Π Ο Ο Ο 2 1 R L V o = P O R L = × 100 × 8 = 40 V i O = I o (sin ω s t + θ ) I o = V o R L = 40 V 8 Ω = 5 A I s = V s R S + R in = 10 -3 V 5 k Ω + 50 k Ω = 1.82 × 10 8 A Chap10 - 5
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Jaeger/Blalock 6/15/07 Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3E McGraw-Hill Amplification: Gain Voltage Gain: Magnitude and phase of voltage gain are given by and For our example, Current Gain: Magnitude of current gain is given by A v = v O v S = V o ∠θ V s 0 = V o V s ∠θ A v = V o V s θ = v A A v = V o V s = 40 V 10 3 V = 4 × 10 4 A i = i O i S = I o ∠θ I s 0 = I o I s ∠θ A i = I o I s = 5A 1.82 × 10 -8 A = 2.75 × 10 8 Chap10 - 6
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Jaeger/Blalock 6/15/07 Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3E McGraw-Hill Amplification: Gain (cont.) Power Gain: For our example, On decibel scale, i.e. in dB A P = P O P S = V o I o V s I s = V o V s I o I s = A v A i A P = 40 × 5 10 3 × 1.82 × 10 8 = 1.10 × 10 13 A vdB = 20log A v A idB = 20log A i A PdB = 10log A P Chap10 - 7
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