BUS 50.3 Chapter 1 - Copy

BUS 50.3 Chapter 1 - Copy - CHAPTER ONE The Nature of...

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CHAPTER ONE The Nature of Negotiation
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Introduction Negotiation is something that everyone does, almost daily
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Negotiation Examples Unions negotiating for salary or other benefits Roommates sharing an apartment Deciding where to go on vacation with a friend Peace discussions between countries
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Negotiations Negotiations occur for several reasons: To agree on how to share or divide a limited resource (e.g., land, property, time) To create something new that neither party could attain on his or her own To resolve a problem or dispute between the parties
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Approach to the Subject Bargaining and negotiation can mean different things: Bargaining : describes the competitive, win-lose situation Negotiation: refers to win-win situations such as those that occur when parties try to find a mutually acceptable solution to a complex conflict
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Characteristics of a Negotiation Situation There are two or more parties There is a conflict of needs and desires between two or more parties Parties negotiate because they think they can get a better deal than by simply accepting what the other side offers them Parties expect a “give and take” process
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Characteristics of a Negotiation Situation (continued) Parties search for agreement rather than : Fight openly Capitulate Break off contact permanently Take their dispute to a third party Successful negotiation involves: Management of tangibles (e.g., the price or the terms of agreement) Resolution of intangibles (the underlying psychological motivations) such as winning, losing, saving face
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Types of Relationships Independent: parties able to meet needs without help or assistance from others Dependent: parties rely on others for what they need Interdependent: both parties need each other in order to achieve outcomes or objectives
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Interdependence Interdependent parties are characterized by interlocking goals Having interdependent goals does not mean that everyone wants or needs exactly the same thing A mix of convergent and conflicting goals characterizes many interdependent relationships
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Types of Interdependence Affect Outcomes Interdependence and the structure of the
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BUS 50.3 Chapter 1 - Copy - CHAPTER ONE The Nature of...

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