Chapter10 - Chapter 10 Motivating the Sales Force Sales...

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Chapter 10 Motivating the Sales Force Sales Management: A Global Perspective Earl D. Honeycutt John B. Ford Antonis Simintiras
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Chapter 10 Motivating the Sales Force Learning Objectives Define motivation; Understand the complexity of motivation; Explain the main theories of motivation; Understand the impact of cultural differences on motivation; Explain various tools available for motivating the global sales force; and Discuss the relationship between motivation and job satisfaction.
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Chapter 10: Motivating the Sales Force What is motivation? Motivation is the inner force that guides behavior and is concerned with the causation of specific actions. Motivation is a three-dimensional construct consisting of the following: Intensity or the magnitude of mental activity and physical effort expended towards a certain action; Persistence or the extension of the mental activity and physical effort over time; and Direction or the choice of specific actions in specific circumstances.
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Chapter 10: Motivating the Sales Force Understanding motivation Motivation should be understood at two levels: What motivates salespeople How salespeople choose their action (the reasons behind the intensity (the direction or decision to engage in and persistence of mental and specific actions in specific physical effort expended) circumstances)
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Chapter 10: Motivating the Sales Force Motivational theories addressing the issue: what” motivates salespeople Need Hierarchy Theory Physiological needs Security needs Belongingness needs Esteem needs Physiological needs (e.g., basic salary); security needs (e.g., pension plan); belongingness needs (e.g., friends in work group); esteem needs (e.g., job title); self actualisation needs (e.g., challenging job). Source: Maslow, 1943) Self-actualisation needs
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Two Factor Theory Motivation factors ( e.g., achievement, recognition, responsibility) Hygiene factors (e.g., supervision, pay, job security, working conditions) The theory argues that: The motivation factors or motivators are the primary causes of motivation and address the question “why work harder ”; The hygiene factors are necessary conditions to achieve a state of neutrality and address the question “why work here ”. Motivational theories addressing the issue:
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This note was uploaded on 08/02/2010 for the course SOC SOC 420 taught by Professor Brathwaithe during the Spring '10 term at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Chapter10 - Chapter 10 Motivating the Sales Force Sales...

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