Mario costa for his overwhelming enthusiasm and his

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Unformatted text preview: -5,11 -13,51 -14,41 -14,44 -14,50 -14,79 -14,83 3 6 5 7 2 1 4 -5,20 -13,54 -14,36 -14,37 -14,38 -14,55 -14,67 3 4 2 6 7 5 1 -5,19 -5,32 -5,32 -13,47 -14,18 -14,58 -14,76 3 6 7 2 5 1 4 -5,10 -13,22 -13,93 -14,26 -14,33 -14,56 -14,61 3 6 7 2 5 4 1 -5,09 -13,09 -13,88 -14,16 -14,16 -14,56 -14,59 3 6 7 2 5 4 1 -5,04 -12,97 -13,72 -14,12 -14,26 -14,47 -14,57 Table III; Ranking of invariant classes Ci i=1,…7, on the planar surface with different size of sampled set The planar model shows the highest log-likelihood among the seven classes, and there is no doubt that the set of points shows a planar symmetry. All other classes have lower log-likelihood values, with two noteworthy exceptions with sets of 12 and 50 points maybe related to singularities in the sampled sets. It is important to observe that the prismatic class holds often the second position while the complex class holds the third position. This fact agrees with the classification of invariant surfaces: the planar class differs from the prismatic class thanks to a tight...
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