EOLSS AGING Longevity & Senescence Preprint ms 08

EOLSS AGING Longevity & Senescence Preprint ms 08 -...

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AGING: LONGEVITY AND SENESCENCE 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 UNESCO ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LIFE & SUPPORTING SCIENCES AGING: LONGEVITY AND SENESCENCE* by ROBERT ARKING, Ph.D. Department of Biological Sciences Wayne State University Detroit, MI 48202 313-577-2891 office/-5280 lab 313-577-6891 fax 248-404-8365 cell [email protected] email 31 32 33 34 35 36 * dedicated to the memory of Seymour Benzer
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AGING: LONGEVITY AND SENESCENCE 2 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 Keywords: Aging, senescence, longevity, health span, transition phase, senescent span, evolution of aging, reproduction, plasticity of aging, biomarkers, survival curves, inflection points, age-specific mortality, extended longevity, longevity determinant mechanisms, public mechanisms of aging, conserved pathways, dietary restriction, energy and longevity, nutrition and longevity, nuclear- mitochondrial interactions, longevity determinant mechanisms, gene networks, genetic architecture of longevity and senescence, inflammation, proinflammatory pathways, stress and telomeres, cell senescence and cell function, lifestyle factors and longevity, societal effects of aging interventions. Glossary: Aging: commonly used as a synonym for senescence. However a more precise definition is that aging is a series of increasingly different and less functional molecular and physiological signatures. This concept is further developed in this article Senescence: commonly used as a synonym for aging. However a more precise definition is the processes responsible for the changes in the aging signatures. This concept is further developed in this article. Longevity: is commonly considered to be the chronological (i.e., sidereal) time an organism lives as measured from birth or hatching to death in forms without a larval stage, or from the initial emergence of the adult form to death in forms with a larval stage. Life span: commonly used as a synonym for longevity. However, a more precise definition is that it is composed of several discrete functional stages: developmental span, health span, transition phase, and senescent span. This concept is further developed in this article. Disease: is the failure to maintain a structure or process at a high functional signature level that allows the accumulation of senescent-dependent stochastic damages which leads the structure or process to fail in a manner characteristic of that genotype in that environment 1..Introduction 1.1 Definitions of Aging and Senescence 1.2 Different Conceptual Models of Aging and Senescence 1.2.1 Medical Models & The Relationship Between Aging and Disease 1.2.2. Evolutionary Models 1.2.3. An Integrated Model Across the Lifespan 1.2.4. Relationship of Reproduction to Longevity 1,2,4,1. Parental Costs 1.2.4.2. Distinguishing the Different Phases of the Life Span 1.3.
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This note was uploaded on 08/05/2010 for the course BIO 5750 taught by Professor Arking during the Winter '09 term at Wayne State University.

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EOLSS AGING Longevity & Senescence Preprint ms 08 -...

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