HRISurvey - Foundations and Trends R in HumanComputer...

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Unformatted text preview: Foundations and Trends R in HumanComputer Interaction Vol. 1, No. 3 (2007) 203275 c 2007 M. A. Goodrich and A. C. Schultz DOI: 10.1561/1100000005 HumanRobot Interaction: A Survey Michael A. Goodrich 1 and Alan C. Schultz 2 1 Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA, [email protected] 2 US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA, [email protected] Abstract HumanRobot Interaction (HRI) has recently received considerable attention in the academic community, in labs, in technology compa- nies, and through the media. Because of this attention, it is desirable to present a survey of HRI to serve as a tutorial to people outside the field and to promote discussion of a unified vision of HRI within the field. The goal of this review is to present a unified treatment of HRI-related problems, to identify key themes, and discuss challenge problems that are likely to shape the field in the near future. Although the review follows a survey structure, the goal of presenting a coher- ent story of HRI means that there are necessarily some well-written, intriguing, and inuential papers that are not referenced. Instead of trying to survey every paper, we describe the HRI story from multiple perspectives with an eye toward identifying themes that cross appli- cations. The survey attempts to include papers that represent a fair cross section of the universities, government efforts, industry labs, and countries that contribute to HRI, and a cross section of the disciplines that contribute to the field, such as human, factors, robotics, cognitive psychology, and design. 1 Introduction HumanRobot Interaction (HRI) is a field of study dedicated to under- standing, designing, and evaluating robotic systems for use by or with humans. Interaction, by definition, requires communication between robots and humans. Communication between a human and a robot may take several forms, but these forms are largely inuenced by whether the human and the robot are in close proximity to each other or not. Thus, communication and, therefore, interaction can be separated into two general categories: Remote interaction The human and the robot are not co- located and are separated spatially or even temporally (for example, the Mars Rovers are separated from earth both in space and time). Proximate interaction The humans and the robots are co- located (for example, service robots may be in the same room as humans). Within these general categories, it is useful to distinguish between applications that require mobility, physical manipulation, or social interaction. Remote interaction with mobile robots is often referred 204 205 to as teleoperation or supervisory control, and remote interaction with a physical manipulator is often referred to as telemanipulation. Prox- imate interaction with mobile robots may take the form of a robot assistant, and proximate interaction may include a physical interac- tion. Social interaction includes social, emotive, and cognitive aspectstion....
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HRISurvey - Foundations and Trends R in HumanComputer...

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